Capital Gains for Richmond

By Galuszka, Peter | Diverse Issues in Higher Education, May 28, 2009 | Go to article overview

Capital Gains for Richmond


Galuszka, Peter, Diverse Issues in Higher Education


Arthur Ashe Jr.'s hometown amasses a surprising athletic leadership profile.

By any measure, Tamika Duck, 25, is on the fast- track for a successful career in sports management. The former center! ariti power forward on the women's basketball team at Virginia Union University from which she graduated hi 2007, has just returned to her alma mater as first-in-command for sports information.

Duck had been working at a similar task at historically Black Virginia State University in Petersburg where she worked on a master's in sports management before winning a job just up the road at VUU in Richmond. "It's just a dream come true," says Duck, who credits her sports-crazed father with advocating her career. "He just pushed on me," she says.

Another man is behind her progress, too, Duck says. The late Arthur Robert Ashe Jr., Richmond, Va., born and raised, cleared away racial barriers in the 1950s and 1960s when he took up tennis at all- Black Brookfield park just a couple of miles from VUU in then strictly segregated Richmond. The famed tennis star braved racial insults in the Jim Crow city where he was allowed to play only Black kids in school matches and could not play on lighted city courts at night. To compete against White players, he had to drive north to Maryland.

Thanks to trailblazers such as Ashe, talented African- Americans such as Duck are having an easier time climbing the ladder of college sports management. In a sweet irony, it seems to be particularly true in Virginia, the so-called "mother of presidents," where White leaders responded to court-ordered integration in the 1950s with their infamous "massive resistance" policy, blocking Whites and Blacks from going to school together.

"I think we have witnessed progress in the past decade or two, but there are challenges and we can turn those challenges into opportunities," says Dr. Bernard Franklin, who is now the highest-ranking Black executive at the National College Athletic Association, the country's foremost college sports organization. Franklin also happens to have strong ties to Virginia. His grandmother's family is from Richmond, and he was president of VUU before joining the NCAA in 2002 to become an executive vice president.

Politics and Sports

Indeed, the list of Blacks with ties to the Old Dominion and its capital and who hold top sports management positions in the pros or at schools is impressive. For instance, Mike Tomlin, a former wide receiver for the College of William & Mary, is now head coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers. Only the 10th Black coach in the NFL, he led the Steelers to Super Bowl victory this year, the second Black coach to take professional football's highest prize.

At the University of Virginia, Craig Littlepage serves as athletics director. The former University of Pennsylvania college star and Wharton Business School graduate first started coaching at UVA in June 1976. "I was welcomed by coaches and student-athletes and families, but I was discouraged. The welcome was not as warm and fuzzy as I thought it would be," he says. That changed in the early 1980s when Black superstar Ralph Sampson racked up massive wins for UVA Cavalier basketball and greatly expanded the school's sports reputation across the nation, he notes.

Basketball coach Jeff Capel led Richmond's Virginia Commonwealth University to a 60-31 record in three years before heading to the University of Oklahoma this spring. Also, Scott Secules, a Newport News native with NFL experience with the Dallas Cowboys, Miami Dolphins and the New England Patriots, is VCU's senior associate athletic director for external affairs. "We at VCU are committed to a broad student body and also to identifying those people best able to work in our department and in coaching," he says.

Such accept- ance has come in fits and starts. It has taken decades, if not generations. "You have to re- member that at the University of Virginia, when I talk to the parents and grandparents of Black players, they remember that this is a school that they could not attend," says Littlepage. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Capital Gains for Richmond
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.