Item Performance in Visual Word Recognition

By Rey, Arnaud; Courrieu, Pierre et al. | Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, June 2009 | Go to article overview

Item Performance in Visual Word Recognition


Rey, Arnaud, Courrieu, Pierre, Schmidt-Weigand, Florian, Jacobs, Arthur M., Psychonomic Bulletin & Review


Standard factorial designs in psycholinguistics have been complemented recently by large-scale databases providing empirical constraints at the level of item performance. At the same time, the development of precise computational architectures has led modelers to compare item-level performance with item-level predictions. It has been suggested, however, that item performance includes a large amount of undesirable error variance that should be quantified to determine the amount of reproducible variance that models should account for. In the present study, we provide a simple and tractable statistical analysis of this issue. We also report practical solutions for estimating the amount of reproducible variance for any database that conforms to the additive decomposition of the variance. A new empirical database consisting of the word identification times of 140 participants on 120 words is then used to test these practical solutions. Finally, we show that increases in the amount of reproducible variance are accompanied by the detection of new sources of variance.

(ProQuest: ... denotes formulae omitted.)

The precision of theoretical accounts in the field of visual word recognition has significantly increased over recent years. Indeed, cognitive modelers have proposed several detailed descriptions of the structure and dynamics of the reading system (e.g., Ans, Carbonnel, & Valdois, 1998; Coltheart, Rastle, Perry, Langdon, & Ziegler, 2001; Grainger & Jacobs, 1996; Harm & Seidenberg, 2004; Perry, Ziegler, & Zorzi, 2007; Plaut, McClelland, Seidenberg, & Patterson, 1996; Seidenberg & McClelland, 1989). The fine-grained precision of these models has led to the development of so-called computational models of reading that can generate precise quantitative predictions. As a consequence, by making fine-grained assumptions about the cognitive architecture of visual word recognition, theorists have also remarkably increased the resolution of theoretical predictions.

This progress in theory has been accompanied by a corresponding gain of precision for empirical data. In a seminal study, Spieler and Balota (1997) asked 31 participants to read aloud a list of 2,870 English monosyllabic words and compared the mean naming latency for each item with the predictions of two computational models of word reading (i.e., Plaut et al., 1996; Seidenberg & McClelland, 1989). The results were somewhat surprising, since both of these models accounted for only a small amount of the item variance (3.3% for Plaut et al.'s model, 10.1% for Seidenberg and McClelland's). Spieler and Balota also noticed that the models explained the amount of variance less well than did the linear combination of three simple linguistic predictors: log frequency, word length, and neighborhood density (which accounted for 21.7% of the variance). Finally, when variables related to onset phonemes were added to the analysis, the simple predictors were able to account for 42% of the item variance. Item-level data therefore seem to provide a critical test for computational models of reading.

Seidenberg and Plaut (1998) claimed, however, that two reasons might explain the relatively low item variance accounted for by these models. First, item means are affected by several factors that are not addressed by these models. For example, they do not specify the processes involved in letter recognition or in the production of articulatory output. Balota and Spieler (1998) noticed, however, that the performance of these models remains surprisingly weak, since they fail to explain more variance than do three simple predictors (i.e., log frequency, word length, and neighborhood density) that are, in principle, captured by these models. Their second, and probably more critical, argument is based on the fact that item data include a substantial amount of error variance. The question is how substantial this amount of error variance is. Comparing Spieler and Balota's database with a similar database recorded by Seidenberg and Waters (1989),1 they found a . …

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