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American Urological Association, 104th Annual Scientific Meeting, Chicago

Well Water May Increase Risk of Bladder Cancer

Drinking well water from unmonitored wells may increase the risk of bladder cancer, according to researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. They speculate that pesticide contamination of well water may be associated with the increased risk. "Cigarette smoking is a well-known risk factor associated with bladder cancer, but sources such as the patient's water supply are coming to light as potential unmonitored risk factors," says AUA spokesman J. Brantley Thrasher, MD. The study aimed to determine the role of ecologie factors in geographic variations observed in bladder cancer rates among U.S. men and women. The researchers compared bladder cancer incidence and mortality among those with a history of smoking, solar ultraviolet radiation exposure, and well-water consumption.

No Dietary Supplement Benefit for Prostate Cancer

Combination therapy with vitamin E, selenium, and soy does not prevent progression of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) to prostate cancer, Canadian researchers report A randomized study of 303 men with confirmed HGPIN took the supplement combination daily for three years and were followed with prostate biopsies at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Researchers found that 26.4 percent of patients developed invasive prostate cancer. The results support the findings of the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), which showed no benefit from vitamin E and selenium combination therapy, despite the promotion of supplements as having beneficial effects on cancer progression. "Unfortunately, as this study shows, we have yet to find a dietary supplement that will reliably prevent prostate cancer," says AUA spokesman Christopher Amling, MD.

* Little Clinical Evidence to Support Bed Bug Treatments

JAMA. 2009;301:1358-1366. [April 1, 2009]

Although bed bugs (Cimex lectularius) have been associated with dozens of human diseases and their bites are treated with a range of drugs, there is no clinical trial-based evidence for the efficacy of treatments, and there is little evidence that they are communicable disease vectors, according to researchers at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson. …

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