The Alliance for Accreditation and Certification of Structured Language Education

By Carreker, Suzanne; Coffman, Nancy | Perspectives on Language and Literacy, January 1, 2008 | Go to article overview

The Alliance for Accreditation and Certification of Structured Language Education


Carreker, Suzanne, Coffman, Nancy, Perspectives on Language and Literacy


Teaching reading is a job for experts.

(Moats, 1999)

Becoming an expert in the teaching of reading requires language education that is informed by research and upholds the highest standards of excellence. Specifically, teachers and therapists need language education that

* promotes the explicit, systematic reading instruction for all children that both research and teaching practices support (Brady & Moats, 1997; National Reading Panel, 2000),

* provides teachers and therapists with a solid knowledge base to teach reading to all children (Moats, 1999), and

* follows established standards that are monitored and periodically reviewed.

Both research and multisensory structured language education (MSLE) for teachers and therapists have been guiding principles of the International Dyslexia Association (IDA). To promote quality structured language education, The Alliance for Accreditation and Certification of Structure Language Education (the Alliance) was formed in 2002 and is sponsored by IDA. Participating in the Alliance with IDA at this time are the International Multisensory Structured Language Education Council (IMSELC) and the Academic Language Therapy Association (ALTA).

The Alliance is dedicated to the improvement of reading instruction through the promotion of specific criteria and high standards for special and general education instruction. Organizations within the Alliance accredit programs offering professional development in MSLE. The accredited programs follow established standards that are monitored and reviewed. The programs attest to the knowledge and abilities of individuals to deliver explicit, systematic reading instruction. Individuals who have successfully completed the requirements for a given program receive a record of completion that indicates the program is an accredited program and the individual is eligible to sit for The Alliance National Registration Exam. Just as accreditation serves as a signal to the public that a particular program meets objective criteria, successful completion of the exam serves as an objective affirmation that an individual has acquired the necessary knowledge and skills to provide appropriate instruction to all children, especially those children who struggle to learn to read.

School administrators and parents often need to verify a program's accreditation or an individual's qualifications. …

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