China into Africa: Trade, Aid, and Influence

By Nyíri, Pál | The China Journal, July 2009 | Go to article overview

China into Africa: Trade, Aid, and Influence


Nyíri, Pál, The China Journal


China into Africa: Trade, Aid, and Influence, edited by Robert I. Rotberg. Washington: Brookings Institution Press, 2008. ? + 339 pp. US$29.95/£17.99 (paperback).

In the last three years, books with titles like China in Africa have been appearing one after another in response to heightened public interest in China's emergence as an investor and aid donor in Africa. Robert I. Rotberg, China into Africa's editor and a political scientist (he has authored books on "rogue nations" and "battling terrorism"), sees China's African involvement as "rapacious" and "exploitive" (p. viii). For Li Anshan, it is, to the contrary, "characterized by ... equality [and] co-development" and "has brought hope to Africa" (pp. 35-36). Such extremes of opinion are characteristic of "China in Africa" books, most of which are edited volumes. The chapters do not engage with or complement each other; rather, they read like policy briefs essays written for a roundtable on whether "China into Africa" is a good or a bad thing. They go through the nowfamiliar themes: what does China want in Africa (resources and political support); is its engagement a continuation of the "brotherly" aid of the 1960s (yes and no); is it a form of neocolonialism (no and yes); is it different from Western engagement (no or yes); is it welcome (it is by the governments, not so much by the people); are its effects deep-going (yes in some countries, not in others); does it threaten Western interests (yes or no). There is a lot of empirical material, but it tends to be either statistical or anecdotal, often gleaned from newspaper reports, and mostly covering areas of engagement that have been described in more detail elsewhere, sometimes by the same authors. For a first attempt to put together such analysis, the compilation would be laudable; for the fourth or fifth, the reader is justified in expecting more.

This is notably the case for the unproductive debate around the c-word, "colonialism". For example, Stephanie Rupp in her chapter argues that the absence of a "civilizing mission" is one way in which China's contemporary engagement with Africa differs from Europe's colonial one (a point made elsewhere by Chris Alden). Yet while it is factually true that the Chinese state is not trying to make "Chinamen" (sic, p. 77) of Africans in the same way France attempted to make Frenchmen out of them, Chinese investors and managers (like their Japanese and Korean counterparts before them) often claim to be transmitting to local workers a particular set of values, centered on a strict work ethic and bodily discipline, that makes them modern individuals fit to survive in the global marketplace. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

China into Africa: Trade, Aid, and Influence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.