A Host of Museums

Southwest Art, September 2009 | Go to article overview

A Host of Museums


SANTA FE

The New Mexico Museum of Art (formerly the Museum of Fine Arts, 505.476.5072, www.mfasantafe.org) houses a collection of more than 20,000 works of art including contemporary southwestern artists and the Santa Fe and Taos masters. Yearly exhibitions feature 20th-century art and photography. The museum is one of Santa Fe's best-known structures, an outstanding example of Pueblo Revival architecture completed in 1917.

Built by Spanish settlers in 1609-1610, the Palace of the Governors (505.476.5100, www.palaceofthegovernors.org) is the oldest public building in the U.S. and has served as a seat of government for four sovereign nations: Spain, Mexico, the Confederacy, and the U.S. The palace became a museum in 1909 and reflects the multicultural history of New Mexico. Authentic Indian jewelry and crafts are sold under the portal daily.

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (505.476.1250, www.miaclab. org) serves as the exhibition facility for the adjacent 63-year-old Laboratory of Anthropology. Included are more than 50,000 pieces of prehistoric, historic and contemporary basketry, pottery, textiles, jewelry, clothing and artifacts crafted by the native peoples of the Southwest.

Dedicated to perpetuating the artistic legacy of Georgia O'Keeffe and to the study and interpretation of American Modernism, the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum (505.946.1000, www.okeeffemuseum.org) houses a permanent collection of more than 130 works of art.

Located in downtown Santa Fe just one block from the plaza, the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (formerly the Institute of American Indian Arts Museum, 505.983.1777, www.iaiamuseum.org) is an internationally respected showcase for contemporary Native American, Alaska Native, and Canadian First Nations art.

With a collection of more than 3,000 objects of Spanish Colonial art and artifacts spanning five centuries and four continents, the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art (505.982.2226, www.spanishcolonial.org) provides new insight into the culture of the first settlers of New Mexico.

The Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian (505.982.4636, www. wheelwright.org) hosts changing exhibitions of contemporary and historic Native American art with an emphasis on the Southwest.

TAOS

Works by the finest 20th-century artists with ties to Taos are displayed at the Harwood Museum of Art (575.758.9826, www. …

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