New York University Comprehensive Epilepsy Center

By Bennett, David | Medical Economics, August 7, 2009 | Go to article overview

New York University Comprehensive Epilepsy Center


Bennett, David, Medical Economics


NEW YORK, NEW YORK

In its 20-year quest to get to the root of seizure disorders, the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at New York University's Langone Medical Center has accumulated a wealth of clinical and research knowledge.

Orrin Devinsky, MD, the center's director, says there is still much ground to explore in the treatment of seizure disorders. One-third of the 3 million people in the United States with epilepsy suffer from seizures that cannot be controlled by medication, he says.

Founded in 1989, the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center has quickly assumed an influential role in the field. It is one of two leading research centers for the Epilepsy Phenome/ Genome Project. The five-year, $21 million project will recruit 4,000 patients and is touted as the first and largest research study of its kind to examine what causes epilepsy, why people respond differently to medications, and why some families include several people with seizures.

For the past decade, the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center has offered a surgical strategy consisting of consecutive procedures performed over a 10-day period during the same hospital admission. The strategy has been successful for helping children with tuberous sclerosis; about 100 cases have been treated at the center to date.

From his pediatric neurology practice in New Jersey, Richard Sultan, DO, has referred more than 100 difficult pediatric seizure cases to the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center. He values the feedback he receives from NYU physicians on every case he refers. …

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