AFM Supports Health Care Reform Plan, Launches Online Advocacy Campaign

By Lee, Thomas F. | International Musician, September 2009 | Go to article overview

AFM Supports Health Care Reform Plan, Launches Online Advocacy Campaign


Lee, Thomas F., International Musician


For years working Americans have watched the country's health care system become less and less accessible to tens of millions of Americans. Costs have skyrocketed and high insurance premiums have made health insurance unattainable for many. Almost fifty million US residents-nine million of them being children-have no health insurance. And each year that number increases to new levels.

With health care costs rising at more than twice the rate of inflation and health care premiums having increased 78% since 2001-in contrast to a 19% increase in wages-we can no longer pretend that the health care crisis does not exist.

And this problem does not affect the uninsured only. The reality is that employers are increasingly shifting health care costs to employees. The result is that the high premiums, deductibles, and co-payments are a growing problem for America's employed who do have heath insurance. Even union workers, who have been on the forefront of the fight for health benefits for working people, are now in danger of losing affordable health coverage because of soaring costs.

In the end one's access to health insurance determines his or her quality of life. Without health insurance, a person cannot take part in preventive medicine, which can mean the difference between an enjoyable and comfortable life to one that is riddled with pain and disease. A person without health insurance cannot afford all the routine exams and visits that many of us take for granted but that are vital to a healthy life. These include yearly physicals, exams to detect cancer in the early and treatable stages, and more.

The AFM recognizes the need for affordable health care and is one of the unions leading the fight for reform. Through its legislative office in Washington, DC, which coordinates the AFM's lobbying efforts, the AFM has been working closely with key members of Congress and the leadership of the AFL-CIO. The AFM recognizes that this cooperation is necessary if any success is going to be achieved and is working vigorously to make reform a reality.

There are, however, powerful groups that oppose health care reform and would prefer that the system remain broken so that a few companies can reap the benefits at the expense of ordinary Americans. These groups use phrases such as "socialized medicine" and "lack of choice" to denigrate health care reform. Nothing could be further from the truth. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

AFM Supports Health Care Reform Plan, Launches Online Advocacy Campaign
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.