A Tribute to Achievement and Excellence

Planning for Higher Education, October-December 2009 | Go to article overview

A Tribute to Achievement and Excellence


Awards programs recognize and applaud individuals and organizations whose achievements exemplify excellence and dedication to provide learning opportunities for everyone whose lives and passions involve higher education

The following pages recognize achievements and excellence of individuals, institutions and organizations through SCUP awards programs

The Founders (Casey) Award for Distinguished Achievement in Higher Education Planning began in 1985 and recognizes exceptional achievement and accomplishments in higher education planning, such as contributions to the literature, the planning models, and other achievements that raise the standards of planning theory and practice. It was named after K.C. Parsons, charter SCUP member and first SCUP president from 1966-68 whose work always focused on the contributions it made to the whole of the community or humanity.

The Distinguished Service Award recognizes exceptional contributions to the activities and success of the society. Recipients are nominated and selected on the basis of their contributions to SCUP length of service, and commitment to its purposes, goals, and activities. This award began in 1989.

The SCUP Award for Institutional Innovation and Integration began in 2009. It recognizes and honors the achievement of higher education institutions or teams of individuals whose work has demonstrated innovative thinking, planning and implementation in an integrated fashion. Areas of achievement that are honored are process improvement and resource enhancement.

The SCUP Excellence in Planning, SCUP Excellence in Landscape Architecture and SCUP/AIA-CAE Excellence in Architecture Program began in 2000. Submittals are made by an institution and consulting firm(s) as a team. The ability to evaluate why and how these plans, facilities, additions, renovations, landscapes, and individuals are worthy of recognition is key to providing clear lessons learned in planning. They are some of the best ways SCUP has to concretely show how the application of all our planning tools in the institute result in exemplary buildings, grounds, institutional success, and careers that inspire.

2009 Founders (Casey) Award Recipient-David E. Hollo well

Purpose of Award

Recipients are selected on the basis of innovative contributions to the improvement of the theory and practice of academic, administrative, financial, facilities, and/or general institutional planning at colleges and universities.

Previous Award Recipients

M. Perry Chapman, Rodney Rose, Arthur J. Lidsky, O. Robert Simha, Patrick O'Meara, John D. (Jack) Telfer, Dennis R Jones, Harlan D. Bareither, Clark Kerr, Frederick W. Mayer, Jack E. Robinson, William F Massy, Hideo Sasaki, Lyman A. Glenny, Richard R Dober, Marvin W. Peterson, Robert C. Shirley, Thomas R. Mason, George C. Keller, Clinton N. Hewitt, Jack E. Freeman, and Raymond M. Haas.

David E. Hollowell is the 2009 SCUP Founders' (Casey) Award Recipient. The award is named after K.C. Parsons, charter member of SCUP and its first president. Parsons' work focused on contributing to the community and the impact it had on people using the space or facility he had planned. He was also a strong proponent of mentoring.

Hollowell has served in higher education administration for nearly 40 years, over half of which as chief operating officer. During the last 25 years, he oversaw planning and construction of over $1 billion in capital construction and renovation projects, which merited recognition by the American Institute of Architects with an honorary membership, the highest honor given to a non-architect.

He has been actively involved with the Middle States Commission on Higher Education for over 15 years. Middle States is one of six regional accrediting agencies in the U.S.

He has been an active member of SCUP for over 30 years and served as president in 1994-95. His thoughtful management style has made him a leader in the planning and management of university campuses and educational delivery strategies. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Tribute to Achievement and Excellence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.