Path to Peace in Israel/Palestine

By Alrabadi, Meriana | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, August 2009 | Go to article overview

Path to Peace in Israel/Palestine


Alrabadi, Meriana, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


A LIVELY PANEL discussion at the ADC convention on June 14 focused on the path to peace in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Panelists discussed how the war on Gaza affected the status of Israeli-American relations, and the urgent need for humanitarian relief to flow into Gaza. Questioners voiced their concerns about how a right-wing Israeli government and a divided Palestinian government can negotiate peace.

Congresswoman Donna Edwards (D-MD), who represents portions of Prince George's and Montgomery Counties and serves on the nonpartisan Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission, visited Gaza after Operation Cast Lead. Sworn in as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives in June 2008, Edwards described her trip to Gaza as "a profound experience" in which she saw the fear and devastation of the region.

"There were so many children who are babies-under 15 years old," she recalled, noting that the younger generation has seen too much violence. "We have an obligation to those young people and it is perhaps the most important obligation that we have here and around the world," Edwards said. "We're not meeting that obligation successfully."

In Gaza, Edwards encountered a young man whose brother had just named his child "Obama," and another who was equally proud that he was engaged in building Qassam rockets. A third younger boy said he just wanted to be able to go to school. Every young person is making choices about how to live their lives in Gaza. "This right here, this is the example of what we will have if we're not fully engaged in peace," she emphasized.

Describing the devastation in Gaza as "unbelievable," Edwards recalled meeting a widow with five children whose home was destroyed. The widow had sent her children to live elsewhere, but she was camping in the rubble, protecting the debris, afraid to leave until her home was rebuilt. Edwards stressed that we must figure out a way to get construction material into Gaza to repair the thousands of homes that were destroyed or damaged.

The African-American congresswoman said she was shocked by the separation between Palestinians and Israelis, especially the separate roadways designated for Palestinians and Jews. Her family came from North Carolina, she explained, and her mother drank from separate water fountains designated for African Americans. Just as segregation in America finally ended, Edwards pointed out, the separation between the Israelis and Palestinians is "unsustainable."

Edwards said that members of Congress and other policymakers should not create hasty resolutions that undermine the president's ability to govern or direct foreign policy. Instead they should educate themselves and investigate diverse points of view. She closed her remarks by urging listeners to work for peace and stability in the region.

Next to speak was J Street executive director and co-founder Jeremy Ben-Ami, who spent 25 years working in government, politics and communications, both in the U.S. and Israel. Ben-Ami served as President Bill Clinton's deputy domestic policy adviser, as well as policy director on Howard Dean's presidential campaign. He also served as communications director for the New Israel Fund. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Path to Peace in Israel/Palestine
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.