Yeah! / We Paid Our Dues

By Norwood, Doug | IAJRC Journal, June 2009 | Go to article overview

Yeah! / We Paid Our Dues


Norwood, Doug, IAJRC Journal


Charlie Rouse Quartet - Seldon Powell Quartet

Yeah! / We Paid Our Dues

Collectables CD-7858

Charlie Rouse Quartet: Charlie Rouse (ts) Billy Gardner (p) Peck Morrison (b) Dave Bailey (d), NYC, December 20 and 21 1960

You Don't Know What Love Is/Lil' Rousin'/Stella by Starlight/Billy's Blues/Rouse's Point/(There Is) No Greater Love

Charlie Rouse Quartet: Charlie Rouse (ts) Gildo Mahones (p) Reggie Workman (b) Art Taylor (d), NYC, July 13 1961

When Sunny Gets Blue/Quarter Moon/I Should Care

Seldon Powell Quartet: Seldon Powell (ts, fl) Lloyd Mayers (p) Peck Morrison (b) Denzil Best (d), NYC, July 14 1961

Two for One/For Lester/Bowl of Soul TT: 77:62

Collectables is a mid-priced reissue label which has been around for a number of years. Its source material comes from a variety of labels, both major and minor, and apparently has been legitimately obtained. Many of the sessions appearing on this label are very well known and highly acclaimed while some of the others are quite obscure (how many remember the Lennie Hambro Columbias or the Lou Stein Epics?).

In many instances, two LPs are combined on one CD - the down side of this is that it's sometimes necessary to eliminate one or more tracks, usually the ones in which you're most interested, because of space limitations. Also, some of the pairings are a bit bizarre - what logic would result in combining Jimmy Giuffre and Mabel Mercer on one CD? Neither of these problems affects the CD reviewed here, however, a reissue in toto of two excellent Epic LPs from the early sixties.

Charlie Rouse has been so closely identified with Thelonious Monk that one has a tendency to overlook the fact that he had a rich and varied musical life apart from his years with Monk. …

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