Introducing the "New" ASPJ and Focusing on Nuclear Weapons and Deterrence

By Stanford, D. K. | Air & Space Power Journal, Fall 2009 | Go to article overview

Introducing the "New" ASPJ and Focusing on Nuclear Weapons and Deterrence


Stanford, D. K., Air & Space Power Journal


Notice anything different? Undoubtedly, those of you who are longtime readers of Air and Space Power Journal immediately spotted changes in the Journal's appearance. We have altered the cover, table of contents, typeface, and layout. We did so not only to highlight (on the cover) our outstanding articles and improve readability, but also to modernize the presentation, make our in-house production more efficient, and improve our ability to publish electronically. We did not make these changes capriciously but carefully considered each one with respect to ASi^s long and distinguished history. In fact, we examined various iterations of the Journal, going back to the early 1960s, to draw inspiration. By taking an "evolutionary" approach, we believe that we've enhanced the presentation of ASPJ while preserving its legacy as the professional journal of the Air Force.

Speaking in Prague, Czech Republic, on 5 April 2009, Pres. Barack Obama declared that "the United States will take concrete steps towards a world without nuclear weapons. To put an end to Cold War thinking, we will reduce the role of nuclear weapons in our national security strategy, and urge others to do the same. Make no mistake: As long as these weapons exist, the United States will maintain a safe, secure and effective arsenal to deter any adversary, and guarantee that defense to our allies. . . . But we will begin the work of reducing our arsenal."

This issue of ASPJ includes a number of topical and insightful articles that wrestle with the two most important issues facing the United States- nuclear weapons and deterrence. …

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