From the Editor

By Pavich, Matthew | Labor Law Journal, Spring 2009 | Go to article overview

From the Editor


Pavich, Matthew, Labor Law Journal


Dear Reader:

Since President Obama's inauguration, it has become increasingly apparent that the new President faces a calcified labor-employment battleground. The early battles promise a protracted fight between employers and unions and the political interests that align themselves with either side.

The pro-labor side has struck quickly, easily pushing The Lily Ledbetter Fair Pay Act onto the President's deskThe first bill signed by the President, the Act reverses the Supreme Court's decision that victims of gender compensation discrimination must file claims within 180 days of a specific discriminatory event, by extending the statute of limitations for an additional 180 days with every discriminatory paycheck. The symbolism inherent in this was clear and both sides are gearing up for the battle over the Employee Free Choice Act, which was reintroduced into the House on March 10.

The intensity of the anti-labor forces has been equal. One of its targets was Hilda SoNs, the choice new Secretary of Labor. Sous, a fervent advocate of EFCA, had her nomination blocked by an anonymous hold for several weeks due, most analysts believe her pro-EFCA stance. The last several months have also seen concerted efforts to attack the United Auto Workers. During negotiations over the auto bailout, Senators Bob Corker, Richard Shelby and Jim DeMint attempted to condition help to the auto companies on the UAW agreeing to a reduction of wages and benefits. …

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