Did You Know?

The Agricultural Education Magazine, September/October 2009 | Go to article overview

Did You Know?


When agriculturally inclined people hear the word "branding," visions of cowboys, horses, ropes and camp fires fill our heads. But branding has been used as a method to identify ownership and markterritoryforthousandsofyears.

Branding livestock has been a practice of animal husbandry dating back to 2700 B.C. Paintings in Egyptian tombs document branding oxen with hieroglyphics. Both livestock and human slaves were marked with a hot iron by the ancient Greeks and Romans. In fact the first branding in the New World was introduced by Hernado Cortez. He brought cattle stamped with his mark of three crosses.

Today advertising companies use the word "brand" or the term "branding" as a tool to identify a producer's product with consumers. Effective branding has always worked to improve market share andrecognitionofaspecificproduct.

Since this issues is devoted to the concept of branding, it seems appropriate to review a few facts from the origin of the concept! See how many of these you already knew about...

1. Did you know orignial registered brands were often sold with ranches?

2. Did you know when choosing a brand you should avoid "closed" characters since tey are more prone to blotching?

3. Did you know cattle brands should have a face at least 3/8 inches wide?

4. Did you know it is a myth that big plain brands affect the sale price of cattle? …

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