Barack Obama: Race, Diversity, and America's Global Competitiveness

By Lattimer, Robert L. | Competition Forum, July 1, 2009 | Go to article overview

Barack Obama: Race, Diversity, and America's Global Competitiveness


Lattimer, Robert L., Competition Forum


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This paper addresses the enormous opportunity and promise that the new American President, President Barack Obama must address as he provides a new form of leadership and charts a new, more worldview American administration; one that he has announced to be more collaborative, and inclusive. The paper also provides an introspection into America's continuing difficulty at resolving the issue of Race relations, and the limiting impact that it is having on America fulfilling the opportunity for unleashing the country's full capacity for creativity and innovation. The issue of Race could retard America at establishing a foundation for helping to shape America's global competitive strategy, and for reaffirming America's leadership as a balanced and reasonable world power; one that retains the moral authority throughout the world. An analysis is conducted, processes are presented, and solutions are offered, as this paper frames some of the more provocative issues that represent some of the major challenges that is defining the New Global Economy, and by extension, the New Age of Competitiveness.

Keywords: Diversity, Leadership, National politics, Racism

INTRODUCTION

It is my thesis, that there is both an intellectual and a practical debate under way globally to define what is the New Economy, and by extension, the New Age of Competitiveness.

This debate, of which I am actively participating, through my research, is to explore the intersection, and the impact of the structure of the global economies, the design of national public policy and workforce change, to the development of global economic systems, and the affect of such on governmental political stability.

The implications for sustained global economic growth and development, the complex tasks of the national policymaker, and the affects on global workforces are key in determining monetary programs by worldwide Central Bankers; in other words, actions by the national policymakers to influence growth through increased government action. It has been said that this is a time for a bold new era for global social and economic reform.

Currently national governments and global organizations in many parts of the world are grappling with the challenges of developing, and managing a more diverse workforce, a workforce in change.

A workforce in change is a workforce that is multi-cultural, multi-lingual, and multi-generational. Faced with the need to develop effective strategies to manage rapid changes in the global economy and in the 21st century workplace, as well as the need to establish a national growth economy that is sustainable; the new challenges have significant implications for the national policymaker, and the future construct of the global economy.

Since the issues of race, cultural transformation, and competitiveness involve dilemmas, at least within the context of the American history, and its current trans-generational and trans-racial society; the factors of a more inclusive reality as the new more expansive leadership model for the 21st century, could very well be, what I refer to as the promise of the President of the United States, Barack Obama, and his new world view.

The American people, who are the foundation of the U.S. economy, as well as to a large degree, the global economy, must appreciate, fully, the importance for participation in the new more globalized economy; an economy that is in transformation, and one that is being defined more in terms as the New Age of Competitiveness, and less in terms of trade protectionism.

AMERICA AND RACE: A VIEWPOINT

"The Black political movement has long been America's moral conscience, reminding our country to live up to its promise."

Bakari Kitwana, Editor, The Crisis

Sambo Glasses

It is said by many African Americans, that they have been helping to bring comfort to the majority of White Americans ever since they have been old enough to distinguish themselves from White Americans. …

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