Review: A Guide to California's Freshwater Fishes

By Miller, Ryder W. | Electronic Green Journal, January 1, 2001 | Go to article overview

Review: A Guide to California's Freshwater Fishes


Miller, Ryder W., Electronic Green Journal


Review: A Guide to California's Freshwater Fishes By Bob Madgic; Illustrated by William L. Crary. Bob Madgic. A Guide to California's Freshwater Fishes. Happy Camp, CA: Naturegraph Publishers, 1999. 160 pp. ISBN 0-87961-254-1 (paper). US$19.95

Out of sight and therefore out of mind, except perhaps when an angler is interested in catching a meal, freshwater fish swim through perilous, degraded and often polluted waters. Once truly wild, some fish species, like the salmon, are also approaching domesticated status due to the reliance on hatchery release programs. Wet, smelly and often cold, fish and their preservation and protection may offer a challenge to conservationists, who have an easier time with the warm fuzzy things we don't want to eat.

Intended as a book for the lay person, A Guide To California's Freshwater Fishes by author and conservationist Dr. Bob Madgic and illustrator William L. Crary succeeds in clearly telling the sad history of California freshwater fishes, celebrating the diversity of freshwater fish that exists in the golden state, and relaying the efforts needed to protect them.

As Madgic points out, fish are the most important indicator of aquatic diversity; they signal the health of our waterways, and therefore in some ways the state of the planet. Madgic notes that California's history is "reflected in the changing status of its fishes." (p. 7)

Madgic begins by telling the long, bleak story of what has happened to the California fish stock, which used to be one of the world's richest. Millions of salmon once migrated up the state's rivers to spawn. As Madgic relays, "In California's inland waters resided some of the most beautiful fish imaginable- -the state's native trout species." (p. 11)

But California's freshwater fish are in trouble. Two-thirds of the 116 native California fishes are now species of special concern. Sixty-six of these species are endemic to the state. Declines have been due to habitat destruction and introduced species. Florida is the only state with more introduced species than California. Introductions of fish for fishing stock, and the desire to stock any fish species in any available water, led to the demise of the local fish, in some cases extirpation of the native fish species. The problem was compounded by agriculture, which consumed a large majority of the state's water supply. The Department of Fish and Game was also a culprit, being interested primarily with satisfying the fisherman rather than protecting the river ecosystems. "The ongoing practice of introductions, designed to enhance sporting opportunities, led to increasingly artificial environments and fishing experiences. Angling in California became more and more designed, and less and less natural. A reliance on hatcheryproduced fish soon became the norm. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Review: A Guide to California's Freshwater Fishes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.