Review: The Science of Saving Venice

By Miller, Ryder W. | Electronic Green Journal, January 1, 2006 | Go to article overview

Review: The Science of Saving Venice


Miller, Ryder W., Electronic Green Journal


Review: The Science of Saving Venice By Caroline Fletcher and Jane Da Mosto Reviewed by Ryder W. Miller San Francisco, USA Caroline Fletcher and Jane Da Mosto. The Science of Saving Venice. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2006. 94pp. ISBN: 88-422-1310-1. US$15.00.

Venice is in trouble. Unless substantial efforts are made to control flooding and barriers are built to divert the seawater from the city, the city will face a crisis in this century. As an "outstanding example of wetland biodiversity" and of mankind's success in battling the elements, Venice is a case study of how mankind has learned to live with the sea and the tides and of how coastal cities can react to rising sea levels caused by global warming.

The Science of Saving Venice is not technical and can satisfy the lay reader. There are wonderful photographs, and heartfelt and hopeful writing. This slim volume quickly acquaints the reader with the problems that Venice faces. The photos and drawings give the reader a sense of the place and the diagrams show in detail the work that needs to be accomplished. The rising waters in Venice's case are also likely to cover the city's architectural wonders.

The six chapters of the book include "Crisis," "Setting," "Flooding," "Remedies," "Barriers," and "Futures. …

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