Intimate Strategies of the Civil War: Military Commanders and Their Wives

By Ramold, Steven | The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, January 1, 2002 | Go to article overview

Intimate Strategies of the Civil War: Military Commanders and Their Wives


Ramold, Steven, The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography


Intimate Strategies of the Civil War: Military Commanders and Their Wives. Edited by CAROL K. BLESER and LESLEY J. GORDON. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001. xxiv, 292 pp. $30.00.

USING a variety of contributed essays, editors Carol Bleser and Lesley Gordon present a varied view of womanhood and family in a setting beyond the norm: the Civil War. The essays are both informative and brilliantly written, providing the reader with an intimate look at the family life of prominent American heroes. The introduction promises more than the essays can deliver, resulting in a book that succeeds best if the reader skips over the introduction. The introduction casts the couples portrayed in the book as exemplars of the Victorian stereotype of dominant men and docile women. Recent research in family history (for example, Stephanie Coontz's The Way We Never Were: American Families and the Nostalgia Trap) clearly demonstrates that these concepts existed only among the upper class of America. If the editors truly want to bridge the artificial separation between military and women's history, then the book should include essays on the marriage/family relations of common soldiers, not just generals.

The editors have chosen marriage relations that fit within their premise, selecting couples with both unusual characteristics and enough surviving documentation to substantiate their thesis. This is best demonstrated in the inclusion of several less well known military couples (S. Phillips and Elizabeth Lee, Josiah and Amelia Gorgas), while omitting more wellknown couples. Most glaring is the omission of Abraham and Mary Lincoln, especially when Jefferson and Varina Davis are included. The Lincolns are most certainly the most documented couple of the Civil War, and their absence immediately lessens the credibility of the book. The inclusion of the Davises unbalances the book by including a Confederate non-military couple without a Union counterpart. The editors should have included the Lincolns or excluded the Davises. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Intimate Strategies of the Civil War: Military Commanders and Their Wives
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.