Could Oxygen Therapeutics Offer Alternative to Transfusions?

By LoBuono, Charlotte | Drug Topics, September 16, 2002 | Go to article overview

Could Oxygen Therapeutics Offer Alternative to Transfusions?


LoBuono, Charlotte, Drug Topics


CLINICAL PRACTICE

A safe, convenient alternative to human red blood cell (RBC) transfusion may one day become available. Oxygen therapeutics represents a potential new category of treatments that may replace blood transfusions. Oxygen therapeutic products deliver oxygen to tissues without having to transfuse blood, said Louis Katz, M.D., vp. for medical affairs, Mississippi Valley Regional Blood Center, Davenport, Iowa.

According to Katz, who is also chairman, Transfusion Transmitted Diseases Committee, American Association of Blood Banks, many reasons exist for developing a substitute for RBCs. He feels the public is most concerned about the transmission of bloodborne infections. He noted that the risk of transmission has become very small, however. A more relevant reason to consider oxygen therapeutics is the exacting requirements for obtaining, processing, and storing blood, he said.

The two major categories of oxygen therapeutics are hemoglobin-- based oxygen carriers (HBOCs), which can be made using either human or bovine hemoglobin, and perfluorocarbon-based products, said Katz. The manufacture and processing of these products should eliminate known pathogens, so they will not transmit infections, he added. HBCs and perfluorocarbons do not require compatibility testing and cross matching.

Both types of products are potentially suitable for long-term storage for months and perhaps years, Katz pointed out. He also said the products currently in clinical trials appear to be capable of reasonably and effectively delivering oxygen to the tissues.

Certain disadvantages to these products do exist, though, said Katz. If the product is derived from human hemoglobin, the supply of human hemoglobin is currently very limited, he said, adding that it generally requires two units of outdated human RBCs to make one unit of an oxygen therapeutic product. It is very expensive to outfit factories to produce HBOCs or perfluorocarbon-based products, he continued. Very large facilities are required.

Short-term use of HBOCs is associated with hypertension, cautioned Katz. Discoloration of the skin is also a potential adverse effect of HBOCs, said John W. Kennedy, M.Sc., president and CEO, Hemosol Inc., Ontario, Canada. This yellowing of the skin, which resembles a bruise, can occur when HBOCs are given at very high doses, he said. Skin discoloration occurs when the hemoglobin in the product, which is metabolized by the liver, becomes backlogged. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Could Oxygen Therapeutics Offer Alternative to Transfusions?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.