Global E-Commerce: A Portal Bridging the World Markets

By Singh, Nitish; Alhorr, Hadi S. et al. | Journal of Electronic Commerce Research, February 1, 2010 | Go to article overview

Global E-Commerce: A Portal Bridging the World Markets


Singh, Nitish, Alhorr, Hadi S., Bartikowski, Boris P., Journal of Electronic Commerce Research


ABSTRACT

This essay examines the importance of e-commerce in the global economy. It introduces the special issue on global e-commerce by providing a guide to the six papers contained in the special isse, and it offers the guest editors perspectives on the growing trends in global e-commerce as well as potential challenges and opportunities that multinationals practicing e-commerce on a gobal scale face. The essay notes the dire need for a scholastic framework within which the several facets of global e-commerce are organized and addressed. Contributions from each of the papers of this issue are also indicated

Keywords: global e-commerce, web localization, culture and web, internet.

1. Introduction

Global e-commerce is expanding rapidly and several trillion dollars are being exchanged annually over the web. The global online population is also increasing substantially and by 2013, Wigder et al., [2009] of Forrester Research predict that there will be 2.2 billion Internet users worldwide and Asia will be the biggest global growth engine. Another interesting trend in global Internet usage is that almost 72.4 percent of these users are now non-English speaking [Internet World Stats, 2009]. So, besides English other languages like Chinese, Spanish, Japanese and French now have significant online usage. By 2010 U.S. retail e-commerce will be about $182.5 billion [Grau, 2008a]. On the other hand, European B2C e-commerce is expected to reach almost $234 billion by 2010 [Grau, 2006].According to e-marketer estimates by 2010 the British market share will fall to 44.5% as France and Germany ramp up their online sales. Asia will also see significant growth in B2C e-commerce with a 23.3 percent annual growth rate and eventually reaching almost $168.7 billion in 2011 [Grau, 2008b]. Japan and South Korea currently lead the B2C e-commerce sales in Asia but by 2011 they will be overtaken by China and India [Grau, 2008b]. From these numbers it is clear that e-commerce is now a truly global phenomenon. Thus web is increasingly becoming a diverse global marketplace with global business opportunities.

To take advantage of the full potential of global e-commerce, companies need to tap into global markets and consider expanding online not only in developed countries but also in the emerging economies of China, Brazil, India and others. Companies may proactively exploit global e-business opportunities and take advantage of the full potential of e-commerce, or may adopt a defensive approach to new global competition threatening their business. Domestic businesses will increasingly feel pressure of global competition as e-business will offer companies a platform to compete on global basis. However, for many companies global e-commerce is still a challenge. Several companies cite following reasons for avoiding taking the full plunge in global e-commerce [Singh and Pereira, 2005; Yunker, 2005]:

* Lack of skills for successful web localization efforts

* Lack of knowledge and application of tools to achieve web localization

* Geo-political and regulatory uncertainties.

* Lack of understanding relating cultural customization of international websites

* Dearth of professionally trained workforce to handle web localization efforts.

Our purpose for this special issue of Journal of E-Commerce Research is to examine the state of the current research on e-commerce in the global arena. This issue contains papers that examine global e-commerce from different conceptual perspectives, offering insights that will only develop and advance our understanding of global-ecommerce, both as a phenomenon on a macro-level and as organizational practices on a micro-level. Along the way we hope that new directions and inquisitive priorities will be developed for our readers.

Our essay is organized in this way: the next section briefly sheds light on the growing global-ecommerce and the utilization of the web among multinational organizations to capture worldwide opportunities and to develop worldwide capabilities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Global E-Commerce: A Portal Bridging the World Markets
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.