Vocal Vibrance. the Complete Technique for Singers and Speakers

By Greschner, Debra | Journal of Singing, March/April 2010 | Go to article overview

Vocal Vibrance. the Complete Technique for Singers and Speakers


Greschner, Debra, Journal of Singing


Suzanne Kale, Vocal Vibrance. The Complete Technique for Singers and Speakers. USA: Lulu.com, 2008. 240 pp., $21.00. ISBN 978-1-4357-0814-3. www.VocalVibrance.com

The goal of Suzanne Kale's book is to help singers attain the feeling that comes with "the magic gig"; that is, a performance that moves beyond the technical, and draws singer and authence together. While Kale's choice of nomenclature may smack of Contemporary Commercial Music (CCM), the phenomenon crosses style barriers. When there is sincere, open communication, and the singer is employing his or her instrument in an efficient way and drawing upon all its unique capabilities, magic does occur, whether in a cabaret or a concert hall.

Kale breaks the act of singing into its components, and lists the aspects in alphabetical order, beginning with articulators and ending with warmups. She provides accurate information on topics ranging from singing scat to the singer's formant, and registers to rehearsal tapes. Each section is short-some only a page in length-and conversational in style. She offers minimal guidance on the order in which the chapters should be read. Begin with breathing, she advises, and then work through vowel sounds and resonance. The section consisting of vocalises, found at the end of the book, should be explored parallel to the readings. Although the subtitle includes speakers, only a single chapter is devoted to the topic; Kale does, however, allude to the speaking voice in other chapters.

The modus operandi is healthy production, and the text reiterates that singers must be constantly sensitive to their vocal health. Beyond that, Kale is nonjudgmental in regard to styles, and encourages singers to listen to all kinds of music. …

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