ReCalling Early Canada: Reading the Political in Literary and Cultural Production

By Moran, Maureen | British Journal of Canadian Studies, May 2007 | Go to article overview

ReCalling Early Canada: Reading the Political in Literary and Cultural Production


Moran, Maureen, British Journal of Canadian Studies


J. Blair, D. Coleman, K. Higginson and L. York (eds), ReCalling Early Canada: Reading the Political in Literary and Cultural Production (Edmonton: University of Alberta Press, 2005), xlvi + 448pp. Paper. $34.95. ISBN 0-88864-440-X.

"O strong hearts, guarding the birthright of our glory,/ Worth your best blood this heritage that ye guard!", wrote Charles G.D. Roberts in 1885. No doubt Roberts little imagined that future generations would rearticulate this inheritance as an ideological construction affirming imperial, bourgeois values and falsifying the alterity of the Canadian past. Yet that is the central thrust of this lively collection of essays by literary and cultural critics who probe the politics sustaining 'Canada's historical imaginary' (x) and concepts of nationhood. Adam Carter's crisp essay on Roberts's national odes is typical of the findings of the volume. He shows how the poet tropes 'a patriotic oneness amongst the citizenry' (118) that is simultaneously undermined by the contradictory personification of the energetic (collective) nation as an infantile (individual) subject. Such ideological tensions surface in most of the pieces in this collection, and Foucault and postcolonial theorists cast a long shadow over the critical approach. Nonetheless, the postmodern rejection of a grand master-narrative proves effective for the reassessment of early Canadian culture.

As the editors remind us, early Canadian materials played - and continue to play - an important part in shaping the Canadian past as a narrative of settlement rather than invasion, as the story of a colony rather than a colonising power. But they also contain alternative, secret histories of indigenous peoples, expatriates and other European settler cultures that destabilise a myth of Canadian harmony. The impressive range of this volume - it deals with visual art, journalism, literature, publishing history, and horse breeding inter alia - prompts many important questions about Canadian history, and the ways in which writers and readers have chosen to recover and re-present it. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

ReCalling Early Canada: Reading the Political in Literary and Cultural Production
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.