The Community That Combines Agricultural Education Together

By Alston, Antoine | The Agricultural Education Magazine, January/February 2010 | Go to article overview

The Community That Combines Agricultural Education Together


Alston, Antoine, The Agricultural Education Magazine


Today's growing global population places greater pressure upon the world's existing food, fiber, and natural resources more than any other time in history. With this factor in mind it is imperative that individuals with the requisite knowledge, skills, and dispositions are placed in positions of leadership to foster the global agricultural industry through both prosperous and turbulent times. According to the National FFA Organization agriculture is America's largest industry with over 21 million individuals employed in various sectors of the industry. With an industry so extensive and vitally important to mankind's very survival it would undoubtedly require many individuals and a diverse array of organizations working in collaboration to ensure the continued flow of food and fiber and the conservative utilization of increasingly scarce natural resources. The African proverb "It takes a village to raise a child" most certainly holds true for the global agricultural industry because it in fact takes a plethora of individuals to promote a sense of agricultural literacy among mankind as a whole.

When I was approached about organizing this theme edition regarding developing professional relationships within the greater agricultural education community, I reflected back upon my career in agricultural education and the importance of the relationships that I have developed over the years. I additionally thought about the relationships that my father and his fellow secondary agricultural educators developed throughout their careers and the impact that each had upon their respective programs. Effective educators, regardless of their discipline, learn early on in their careers that providing students with a dynamic educational experience involves more than traditional classroom methodologies, but is truly a community endeavor involving an assortment of stakeholders (i.e. parents, administrators, entrepreneurs, community colleges, etc.) which bring a multitude of resources and experiences to the educational environment. As a teacher educator I have witnessed firsthand the positive impact that developing a network of professional relationships can have upon one's students outlook - i.e. providing them with a cadre of contacts, resources, and experiences I realistically could not provide solely as an instructor. The old saying that "two heads are better than one" is truly a profound statement, particularly when it comes to developing quality educational programming in agriculture.

The World Food Program (2009) estimates that about one billion people are undernourished globally, a factor which can be attributed to several key factors including a poor agricultural infrastructure and the unwise use of environmental resources. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Community That Combines Agricultural Education Together
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.