Editor's Note

By Desrochers, John | National Association of School Psychologists. Communique, March/April 2010 | Go to article overview

Editor's Note


Desrochers, John, National Association of School Psychologists. Communique


School psychologists have a lot to celebrate this month: The APA Council of Representatives voted to maintain the exemption in its model licensure act, recognizing that SEAs have jurisdiction over the title and practice of school psychologists; the Chicago convention was hugely successful; and spring has finally arrived!

This issue of Communiqué covers several of our major themes for the year: multicultural competence, positive psychology, crisis management, and advocacy. The front-page article by McKinney, Bartholomew, and Gray on the use of RTI and SWPBIS to help address the disproportionate representation of African Americans and other culturally and linguistically diverse populations in special education complements other articles on disproportionality published earlier this year. It is also the subject of this month's online Communiqué discussion in the NASP Communities. I urge you to participate in this discussion of one of the compelling issues in school psychology today. You will also find handouts in this issue on enhancing home-school relationships with culturally diverse families and support strategies for working with urban students in high-poverty schools. I want to take this opportunity - before the school year ends - to thank Liz AVant and Mary Beth Klotz, who consistently (and usually behind the scenes) champion the publication of high quality articles about multicultural issues in COMMUNIQUÉ.

The application of strategies derived from positive psychology will continue to be emphasized in Communiqué into next year. …

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