Chief Justice Thomas J. Moyer, 1939-2010

By Pfeifer, Paul E. | Judicature, March/April 2010 | Go to article overview

Chief Justice Thomas J. Moyer, 1939-2010


Pfeifer, Paul E., Judicature


Some people live their lives consciously understanding the eternal truth that escapes so many others: Our thoughts, words, and conduct are vitally Important because we are all interconnected and we therefore must think, speak, and behave with civility, compassion, and understanding. Ohio Chief Justice Thomas J. Moyer understood this, and by living this eternal truth he contributed to the improvement of the justice system in Ohio, the United States, and abroad in ways that will be felt for decades.

Chief Justice Moyer died unexpectedly on Good Friday, April 2, 2010, at age 70. He was planning to retire at the end of die year after 24 years of service as the head of the Ohio Judiciary, and he was the dean of the national community of Chief Justices, having served longer than any of his peers. With his untimely departure, we were deprived of many more years of leadership in service of the cause of improving die administration of justice. We know this because Chief Justice Moyer had given every indication that he would be active in retirement, supporting further reforms of the judicial system. We know also that he would have been effective in these efforts because he was so very effective hi every other area of his career.

Chief Justice Moyer served in numerous national leadership positions, including president of the Conference of Chief Justices (CCJ), chair of the CCJ Task Force on Politics and Judicial Selection, and coçhair of the CCJ Committee on Emergency Preparedness in the Courts. He also served as vice chair of the Advanced Science and Technology Adjudication Resource Center, a national consortium to prepare judges for managing die resolution of disputes that present complex science issues, and he was on the board of Justice at Stake. …

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Chief Justice Thomas J. Moyer, 1939-2010
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