The Color of Work: The Struggle for Civil Rights in the Southern Paper Industry, 1945-1980

By Richards, Lawrence | The Arkansas Historical Quarterly, Autumn 2002 | Go to article overview

The Color of Work: The Struggle for Civil Rights in the Southern Paper Industry, 1945-1980


Richards, Lawrence, The Arkansas Historical Quarterly


The Color of Work: The Struggle for Civil Rights in the Southern Paper Industry, 1945-1980. By Timothy J. Minchin. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2001. Pp ix, 277. Acknowledgments, abbreviations, introduction, conclusion, notes, bibliography, index. $55.00, cloth; $24.95, paper.)

Timothy Minchin has now completed his second book based on the rich trove of material found in the records of Title VII lawsuits filed during the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. Whereas his first book on African-American workers focused on textiles (Hiring the Black Worker: The Racial Integration of the Southern Textile Industry [1999]), his latest offering turns its attention to another important southern industry: paper mills. Unlike textile manufacturers, who had for the most part completely excluded black workers up until the 1970s, employers in the paper industry had a long history of hiring African Americans. And in contrast to the largely union-free textile industry, paper mills were one of the most thoroughly organized industries in the South. Despite these differences, however, the story of integration in both these cases is strikingly similar.

Before the 1960s, African Americans were confined to the dirtiest and most undesirable jobs in the industry. Minchin points out that about 15 percent of jobs in the paper industry were classified as laboring positions in 1960, which roughly corresponded with the 14 percent of workers who were black. This situation was similar to that found in tobacco, steel, and textiles, as described in Minchin's earlier work and in studies by Judith Stein, Robert Korstad, and Nelson Lichtenstein.

Unionism in the paper industry also replicated the segregated pattern found in steel and tobacco. According to Minchin, the segregation of locals had both positive and negative consequences. Since each union was granted jurisdiction over certain jobs, occupational segregation became enshrined in the union contract and white locals continually refused to support blacks in their efforts to gain more job opportunities. On the other hand, separate black locals provided a forum for African Americans to voice their complaints against the system. In many paper mill communities, the leading activists in the civil rights movement were presidents of black locals. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Color of Work: The Struggle for Civil Rights in the Southern Paper Industry, 1945-1980
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.