Language

By Bastos, Flávia | Art Education, May 2010 | Go to article overview

Language


Bastos, Flávia, Art Education


The limits of my language mean the limits of my world.

-Ludwig Wittgenstein

In a recent class discussion with my students, I examined ways of facilitating students' prolonged engagement with works of art, a process that Hurwitz and Day (2007) described as moving from a glance to a sustained engagement. We engaged in a conversation about how teachers can help students of all ages develop language about art and the significance of doing so. As art educators we understand that language is the tool of interpretation. Barrett (2003) clarifies that to "interpret is to respond in thoughts and feelings and actions to what we see and experience, and to make sense of our responses by putting them into words" (p.200). Therefore language provides a device to dismantle and reassemble, manipulate and expand, articulate and share our experiences with art. In this issue, however, I invite readers to also focus on the role of language in shaping, sustaining and transforming our field.

James Rolling focuses on narrative as a fundamental process of human research and development. His account of teaching experiences is positioned as an open invitation to researchers to tell their stories and to teachers to reflect on theirs. Julia Marshall argues that art, particularly integrative contemporary art, is inherendy connected to all disciplines, even sharing some content, methods, goals with other areas of study. She examines five integration strategies used by contemporary artists to reconcile integration with the study of art. Joyce Millman expands conversations about the significance of multicultural education, developing an approach to use with her own certification students that is informed by her experience as a middle school art teacher, especially her participation in with a National Writing Project committed to improving literacy in public schools. Dawn Stienecker's Instructional Resource examines our language about art cars, their role our visual cultural environment, and the definitions associated with them.

Ryan Shin speaks about ethnic visual culture objects from the standpoint of a native Korean who lives and works in the United States who asks if their history, identity, form and function, and cultural significance are worthy of study in the art classroom. He proposes that by studying such objects, students may develop more critical perspectives on the appropriation, exploitation, and consumption of an ethnic group's culture by dominant groups and popular culture. Olga Hubard distinguishes between two kinds of group dialogue that can help students make meaning from works of art: (a) predetermined and (b) interpretive. She argues that these two forms are associated with different approaches to education: predetermined dialogue is aligned with objectivism and interpretive dialogue with constructivism. Valerie Innella describes a service-learning experience that took place in a museum studies program. Students' voices represent a variety of worldviews and understandings of the works, which can inspire museum audiences to create their own meaning when viewing the works. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Language
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.