My Moment of Rock-Star Glory at a Climate Change Sceptics' Conference in America

By Delingpole, James | The Spectator, May 29, 2010 | Go to article overview

My Moment of Rock-Star Glory at a Climate Change Sceptics' Conference in America


Delingpole, James, The Spectator


Wow! Finally in my life I get to experience what it's like to be a rock star and I'm loving every moment. OK, so the drugs are in pretty short supply. As too is the meaningless sex with nubile groupies. But what do I care, the crowd love me and I love them. God bless America! God bless the Heartland Institute's Fourth International Conference on Climate Change!

You'd think it would be quite dull, a conference of 700 climate sceptics (or 'realists', as we prefer to call ourselves) cooped up for two and half days of intense panel sessions ('Quantifying the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Marine Organisms'; 'Green Eggs and Scam: the Myth of Green Jobs'; 'Analysis of the Russian Segment of the HADCRUT3 Database') and lectures (beginning at 7.30 a. m). But I haven't had so much fun in years.

First, the hospitality. They know how to look after you, these right-leaning US think tanks - even modest-sized ones like the free market Heartland Institute, which suffers the misfortune of being largely funded by private donors rather than - contrary to what you're told by many greens - Big Oil, Big Carbon or Big Totally Evil. Food is good. Booze is plentiful. There is little wimping out - especially not from the strong Aussie delegation including Senator Cory Bernardi and scientists Bob Carter and Ian Plimer.

Second, the people. Here I am, a humble blogger and polemicist with a mere English literature degree, rubbing shoulders with some of the world's most eminent oceanographers, economists, geologists, physicists, astrophysicists - even a couple of astronauts. I can't believe it. I am not worthy. But instead of shunning me they're coming up and shaking me by the hand and thanking me for the modest service I have done for their cause. Our cause.

At my session, I find myself in the ludicrous position of being on a 'science' panel with distinguished rocket scientist Fred Singer, Ross McKitrick (the Canadian economist who, with Steve McIntyre, exposed the flaws in the infamous Hockey Stick) and meteorologist Joe D'Aleo (whose research into the siting of weather stations and the Urban Heat Island effect has cast serious doubt on the extent of late-20th-century 'global warming'). I feel a bit embarrassed by the flipness of the chosen title for my talk, which is: 'Climategate and the war against ManBearPig.' (ManBearPig, in case you don't know, is the mythical beast Al Gore uses to terrify the kids when he comes to give a lecture at South Park Elementary in Matt Stone's and Trey Parker's cultish cartoon series. ) The BBC's Roger Harrabin - one of the Beeb's army of die-hard Warmists - has noticed too. 'What's a know-nothing like Delingpole doing on a science panel?' he has asked the organisers, as if this simple fact alone is enough to render the entire conference invalid. (Moments later, when I introduce myself, he says he's quite tempted to punch me because of all the lies and disinformation I put out - though he later apologises and puts it down to jet lag. ) I make this the subject of my speech. What is a non-scientist like me doing here? Simple.

I'm here to point out that the Anthropogenic Global Warming scare is not about science and never was. As Climategate proved (but as some of us suspected long before), AGW is the invention of a cabal of activists, all working towards more or less the same ecofascist agenda: Mother Gaia is suffering; it's mostly our fault; the only way to atone for our sins is to destroy Western industrial civilisation and shackle ourselves with a form of One World government run by 'experts' and bureaucrats over whom we have no democratic control. …

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