Publishing Your Music Education Research: A Seminar for Future Authors A Summary of the 2009 Ohio Music Education Association Research Forum Presented by Dr. Wendy Sims

By Schatt, Matthew D. | Contributions to Music Education, January 1, 2009 | Go to article overview

Publishing Your Music Education Research: A Seminar for Future Authors A Summary of the 2009 Ohio Music Education Association Research Forum Presented by Dr. Wendy Sims


Schatt, Matthew D., Contributions to Music Education


The Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) Research Committee annually hosts a Graduate Research Forum in conjunction with the OMEA's Professional Development Conference. In 2009, the guest speaker was Dr. Wendy Sims, Director of Music Education at the University of Missouri - Columbia and Editor of the Journal of Research in Music Education. An Ohio native, Sims received her undergraduate and masters degrees in music education from Kent State University and earned her Ph. D. from Florida State University. An author and practicing researcher, Sims has published in a variety of preeminent journals including Psychology of Music, International Journal of Music Education, Music Educators Journal, and Journal of Research in Music Education. Sims encouraged those in attendance to consider research as a viable opportunity for professional growth. She also provided insights into the periodical publication process, offering suggestions to assist both novice and experienced researchers in developing their understanding of what is needed to author publishable research studies.

Dr. Wendy Sims, a distinguished researcher in the field of music education, initiated the 2009 Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) Research Forum with a fundamental question of her audience: "Why do people do research?" The question was later clarified through an additional caveat that the audience was to only respond with "noble reasons." This singular instance established Sims' rapport with the audience and prepared the listeners for a session satiated with personal wisdom, humorous anecdotes, and a continuous demonstration of Sims' love of music education research. Answers to Sims' preliminary question ranged from intellectual to pedagogical in nature with Sims reminding the audience of an additional purpose of undertaking research - "because it's fun!"

Inspiring Future Researchers

Research in music education need not be confined to veteran researchers. In order to encourage students' enthusiasm toward music education research, Sims proposed that professors might start by finding ways to get their students to visit their institutional library more often. While an excellent starting point toward research, Sims noted that despite the enhanced efficiency of online journals, there is an inimitable experience of being inside of a physical library among the stacks of bound periodicals surrounded by a wealth of information. In her characteristic personable style, Sims suggested that professors use such cunning strategies as hiding a dollar in a library book or designing a makeshift scavenger hunt that asks students the placement of a specific book or periodical on a shelf in order to entice students into visiting their institutional library.

Relating the publication process to personal experience, Sims divulged some new changes to the Journal of Research in Music Education (JRME) - the periodical with which she maintains the position of editor. She indicated that due to an increased quantity of manuscript submissions, JRME would be expanding its review board from 17 to 21 members, each member holding a 6-year term. As a means to encourage young researchers toward personal and professional growth, Sims noted that more institutions are requiring students to delve into research as a part of their academic programs than in the past. Sims expounded that a host of new methodologies in the research community and many fresh opportunities for the novice researcher also contribute to submission of a greater number of manuscripts representing a wider variety of methodologies, necessitating a larger and more diverse group of reviewers. In order to clarify a particular area of interest or research topic, Sims suggested perusing Vision 2020: The Housewright Symposium on the Future of Music Education. This document is available online at http://www.menc.org. Sims also proposed that novice researchers consider applying to national poster sessions to disseminate their research. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Publishing Your Music Education Research: A Seminar for Future Authors A Summary of the 2009 Ohio Music Education Association Research Forum Presented by Dr. Wendy Sims
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.