Industry Insider: John Fisher

By Kadlecek, Jim | Sport Marketing Quarterly, June 2010 | Go to article overview

Industry Insider: John Fisher


Kadlecek, Jim, Sport Marketing Quarterly


Title: Vice President of Ticket Sales and Service, Arizona Diamondbacks

Education: BSBA in sport management, Robert Morris University

Career: Director, Group Sales, Cleveland Cavaliers and Quicken Loans Arena Vice President of Ticket Sales and Service, Lake Erie Monsters (AHL) Account Executive, Pittsburgh Pirates Group Sales Account Executive, Tampa Bay Lightning

This interview was conducted by Jim Kadlecek, associate professor and chair of the Department of Human Performance and Sport Business at Mount Union College and Vice President for Industry Relations of the Sport Marketing Association.

Q: Please provide an overview of your responsibilities with the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Fisher: I am responsible for all ticket sales for the organization, which includes season ticket sales and service, group sales, suite sales, and service and ticket operations. We have about 60 total staff members that are each dedicated to a specific area of our ticket sales business.

Q: You came to Arizona from the Cleveland Cavs. How has selling the Diamondbacks differed from selling the Cavs?

Fisher: The basics of selling tickets remains the same regardless of the team, market or league. It's about establishing strong relationships and finding the best fit for the customer based on their needs and that's done through a proactive sales effort by a well-trained, dedicated group of sales reps that are equipped with all the necessary resources. Beyond those basics, however, there are definitely differences. In Cleveland, we had a team with a well-established history and a fan base that went back 40 years. In addition, we had a competitive team for my last few seasons there, which was highlighted by LeBron James, obviously one of the best and most popular players in the league. The ability to leverage the NBA's stars is one of the most powerful sales tools for that league's teams. In Arizona, although the Diamondbacks have had quite a bit of success on the field, we're a young franchise that has only existed since 1998 and we are in a transient market so many of the baseball fans here in Phoenix grew up watching teams like the Cubs, Cardinals, or Dodgers. It's also a long season with 81 home games and we have 49,000 seats to fill. That's twice the games and twice the capacity than what I was selling in Cleveland.

Q: You were with the Pirates before joining the Cavs. What changes do you see with the business side of Major League Baseball since your time with the Pirates?

Fisher: The business side of baseball has changed quite a bit and continues to change. Over the past few years, teams have started increasing the size of their sales and service staffs and have put more resources toward proactively selling tickets. Not too long ago a sales and service staff might consist of 12 to 15 staff members, now some teams have upward of 45 or more. We increased to about 60 staff members in sales, service, and operations prior to the 2008 season. There is also far more communication between teams and more idea sharing so we can all help each other sell tickets.

Q: What have you learned, from a sales standpoint, selling when the team is struggling (Pirates, Lightning) or the team is successful (Cavs)?

Fisher: Focusing on the overall game experience is important in ticket sales because team performance can change rapidly, from year to year or even week to week or game to game. It's also important to develop strong relationships with customers and prospects and provide them with the highest level of service possible. By focusing on what can be controlled and delivering a high level of value, the impact of team performance can be slowed during times when team performance is down and maximized when team performance is up.

Q: Phoenix has been hit extremely hard by the economy. What changes have you made at the Diamondbacks to address the challenging times?

Fisher: Like most teams, we saw a dramatic decrease in the corporate spend leading up to the start of the 2009 season and all indications led us to believe there wasn't going to be much improvement as we began our 2010 campaign. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Industry Insider: John Fisher
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.