The Open-Borders Network: How a Web of Ethnic Activists, Journalists, Corporations, Politicians, Lawyers, and Clergy Undermine U.S. Border Security and National Sovereignty

By Gemma, Peter B. | The Journal of Social, Political, and Economic Studies, Summer 2010 | Go to article overview

The Open-Borders Network: How a Web of Ethnic Activists, Journalists, Corporations, Politicians, Lawyers, and Clergy Undermine U.S. Border Security and National Sovereignty


Gemma, Peter B., The Journal of Social, Political, and Economic Studies


The Open-Borders Network: How a Web of Ethnic Activists, Journalists, Corporations, Politicians, Lawyers, and Clergy Undermine U.S. Border Security and National Sovereignty Kevin Lamb Representative Government Press, Raleigh, 2009

The Open Borders Network delves into the inner workings of diverse and powerful special interests who are lobbying for the concept of a borderless society. Although public opinion polls repeatedly show a wide majority of Americans favoring strong controls on immigration, the author, Kevin Lamb, notes that: "Lawmakers are deadlocked on immigration reforms, in part, because of their inability to reconcile their constituents' desire to clamp down on illegal immigration with highly aggressive, well-organized ethnic constituency groups." He describes how politicians ranging from New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg to Senator Larry Craig from conservative Idaho have, for different reasons, promoted amnesty for illegal aliens and opposed construction of a border fence.

This book is far more than an overview of the politics involved in the immigration debate. Each chapter is devoted to the details of how the money and momentum is on the side of those seeking permanent resident status for the estimated 12-15 million illegal aliens in America.

Funding of the pro-immigration lobby is an extraordinary piece of the puzzle. Corporations seeking cheap labor and their allies-tax-exempt foundations with a multi-cultural political agenda-lead the way. According to Lamb's research, the Ford Foundation seeded the militant Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund with a grant of $2.2 million. La Raza ("The Race"), which maintains a network of 300 affiliate community-based organizations, is supported by the Ford Foundation, Bank of America, PepsiCo, CitiBank, Wal-Mart, Comcast, and Verizon.

In 2006, the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), one of many groups carefully dissected in the book, received $5 million from Comcast to organize a voter registration drive in Hispanic communities. Comcast asserts this was part of its goal of "attracting and retaining a multicultural workforce." LULAC is also subsidized by Tyson Foods - a company with a history of smuggling illegal aliens into the USA. Tyson's has donated over 200 million meals that are distributed by LULAC's community organizers (a position from which Barack Obama launched his meteoric rise to power).

Financial support from corporate interests and tax-free foundations for pro-immigration legal work - one of the most effective weapons in the arsenal of the pro-immigration army (and they have many as Lamb documents)-is impressive. Steps taken by state and local legislatures to address a variety of immigration issues, ranging from crime to voter fraud, are often met with a step backward in court. …

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