A Randomized Open Label Comparison of the Effects of Risperidone and Haloperidol on Sexual Function

By Beyraghi, Narges; Ershadi, Mona et al. | Iranian Journal of Psychiatry, Summer 2009 | Go to article overview

A Randomized Open Label Comparison of the Effects of Risperidone and Haloperidol on Sexual Function


Beyraghi, Narges, Ershadi, Mona, Azar, Mahyar, Mousavi, S. Jaber, Iranian Journal of Psychiatry


Objective: Sexual dysfunction in patients who take antipsychotics causes a decline in their quality of life and medication acceptance. Considering the restrictions in cross sectional design of many earlier researches, we used a clinical trial aimed at assessing sexual dysfunction by substituting Risperidone, an atypical antipsychotic drug, with Haloperidol, a typical one .

Method: This clinical trial was conducted on 51 patients who had been using Risperidone with a minimum dose of 2 mg/daily for at least 2 months. The patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. The first group continued taking Risperidone, whereas the second group was given Haloperidol. Sexual function prior to and after the drug substitution was assessed using a sexual questionnaire designed to assess four stages of sexual function .

Results: Compared to those who changed their medication to Haloperidol, the patients who remained on Risperidone therapy suffered from more sexual dysfunction, especially in their tendency towards having sexual activities (P= 0.01), post menstrual sexual activity (P= 0.002), and reaching orgasm in their sexual activities (P= 0.04); however in the Haloperidol group, no significant difference was observed before and after the change in medication .

Conclusion: Although Risperidone and Haloperidol can both disturb patients' sexual function, the side effects of Risperidone are stronger. Hence to prevent the decline of medication acceptance or irregular consumption by patients which may lead to possible relapse, substitution of Risperidone with another drug with fewer side effects on sexual activities is definitely to the advantage of the patients .

Key words: Adverse effects, Antipsychotic agents, Haloperidol, Risperidone, Sexual dysfunction

Iran J Psychiatry 2009; 4:116-119

One of the strongest predictors of patients' unwillingness for drug consumption is their experience of drug side effects. The major side effect of antipsychotic drugs in both sexes is sexual dysfunction which leads to the deterioration of quality of life and a decline in treatment acceptance by the patients. Hence considering the nature of sexual dysfunction and its vital role in the patients' quality of life and their treatment acceptance, selecting a drug with the least side effects should be a priority(1).

Literature reports that both typical and atypical drugs like Haloperidol and Risperidone can affect sexual function adversely (1,2).

The 2006 Knegtering et al study, conducted on 46 patients, compared the effects of Olanzapine and Risperidone on sexual function and reported less sexual dysfunction in patients using the latter(3).

In 2006, Dossendbachm et al simultaneously evaluated the effects of typical and atypical antipsychotics on the sexual function of schizophrenic patients among the patients from the schizophrenia study centers in Austria and Australia, and found that sexual dysfunction in schizophrenic patients leads to deterioration in their life quality and a decline in their treatment acceptance.

Following a one-year period of the treatment, sexual dysfunction was found to be remarkably higher in the Risperidone and Haloperidol groups as compared to the Olanzapine and Queitiapine groups (2). However, the Bobesj et al study conducted in the psychiatry ward of the Spanish Oviedo University-teaching hospital indicated that no meaningful/significant differences in side effects were found /observed between the longterm side effects of typical (Haloperidol) and atypical antipsychotic drugs, including Risperidone (4).

In 2003, in Scotland, Hunter et al, through a systematic review of the data from 1980 to 2002, concluded that Risperidone is more effective than Haloperidol in improving the positive and negative signs, thereby decreasing the possibility of relapse within the first year following the treatment. However, Risperidone had less sexual side effects compared to Haloperidol, demonstrating that Rispridone is more acceptable for treating patients with schizophrenia than Haloperidol (5). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Randomized Open Label Comparison of the Effects of Risperidone and Haloperidol on Sexual Function
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.