ASA Projects: Living Well, Cultural Competency and More

By Cavanaugh, Gloria | Aging Today, September/October 2002 | Go to article overview

ASA Projects: Living Well, Cultural Competency and More


Cavanaugh, Gloria, Aging Today


In this issue, I want to update readers of Aging Today on some of the marvelous special projects the American Society on Aging (ASA) staff have been involved with. These projects are part of our effort to enhance the skills and knowledge of professionals who work with older adults and their families, but they tend to get less of the limelight than ASA's more well-known conferences and publications.

California Substance Abuse and Aging Project-For the past six years, ASA has conducting training and technical assistance for service providers in California working with older adults on issues of substance abuse. In 2001 alone, we instructed nearly 2,700 providers in 53 trainings held throughout the state. The project also conducted the first-ever national conference on treatment and recovery for older adults with substance abuse problems, drawing 200 participants.

Recently, ASA was awarded another three-year contract with the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs to extend the project through 2004. As part of the new contract, we have launched a website enabling providers to learn about the project, access educational programs, participate in nearby training sessions and needs assessments, and question experts about substance abuse in older adults. Visit the project website at www.asaging.org/AOD. For more information about the project-and how ASA might bring these trainings to your state-contact Patrick Cullinane at patrickc@asaging.org.

Live Well, Live Long: Steps to Better Health-Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Live Well, Live Long" is providing resources for professionals wishing to develop health-promotion programs in local communities. This five-year project will conclude in September 2004.

The Live Well, Live Long: Steps to Better Health website includes a healthpromotion primer, "Blueprint for Better Health"; a condition-specific module titled "Strategies for Cognitive Vitality"; and a resource clearinghouse and bulletin board to keep users informed of progress within the field of health promotion for older adults.

"Strategies for

Cognitive Vitality" was developed with additional funding from the MetLife Foundation and the Archstone Foundation as part of ASA's MindAlert program to promote mental vitality among older adults. We are developing more modules on medication management, depression, cardiovascular health, diabetes and other conditions. Each will include a readable description of the condition, chronic disease or health issue, as well as a discussion of the impact of the condition on the community, caregivers and the individual. All materials are free to those who log on to the site at www.asa ging.org/cdc. For more information, contact project manager Nancy Ceridwyn at nancyc@asaging.org.

CARE-Pro (Caregiving Awareness through Resources and Education for Professionals) aims to increase the skills and knowledge of health professionals providing services to family caregivers and link professional groups to the aging network and the National Family Caregiver Support Program, the U.S. Administration on Aging's newest initiative. CARE-Pro is a cooperative venture involving ASA, the American Nurses Association, the American Occupational Therapy Association and the National Association of Social Workers. A key component of CARE-Pro will be an e-- learning self-study curriculum for health and service professionals, to be released in the fall of 2003. …

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