Psychological Predictors of Conflict Management Behaviour of Labour Leaders in Lagos State, Nigeria

By Bankole, Akanji Rafiu | Ife Psychologia, September 2010 | Go to article overview

Psychological Predictors of Conflict Management Behaviour of Labour Leaders in Lagos State, Nigeria


Bankole, Akanji Rafiu, Ife Psychologia


The study examined the joint and relative effects of emotional intelligence and communication skill on conflict management behaviour of labour leaders in Lagos State, Nigeria. A descriptive survey research design was adopted using questionnaire as the main instrument. 180 respondents (labour leaders) were purposively selected from ten (10) randomly selected industrial unions in Lagos State. Data collected were analysed using multiple regressions at 0.05 alpha levels. The findings indicated significant composite effect of communication skill and emotional intelligence on conflict management behaviour of labour leaders (R= .458; Adjusted R^sup 2^ = .201 (20.1%); F ^sub (2,177)^ = 23.446, P < 0.05). In addition, the result revealed that communication skill has a stronger significant effect on conflict management behaviour of the respondents (B = .212, t = 4.747, p <.05). Based on the findings, it was recommended among other things, that government should organize intervention training programme on the two skills for labour leaders and that labour leaders be encouraged to update themselves educationally in order to enhance their communication skills.

Keywords: emotional intelligence, communication skills, conflict management behaviour, labour leaders.

Introduction

The problem of conflict and conflict management in work organizations has become an issue of great concern to both the government and employers of labour in the organized private sectors especially in developing countries of the world including Nigeria. This is because despite the operation of the existing machineries (e.g. collective bargaining and statutory machinery) for conflict management in Nigeria, the incidence of industrial conflict is consistently and persistently on the increase (Onyeonoru, 2004; Kester, Samuel and Bankole, 2006; Bankole, 2007).

The incidence of industrial conflict in Nigeria has become so devastating such that the socio-economic and technological development of the nation has been hampered. The inability of the available conflict resolution machineries to nip in the bud the menace of industrial conflict has prompted some industrial relations experts to advocate for better alternative options such as social dialogue, peace education, UNESCO's peace culture and a host of others (Abu, 1998; Ajala, 2003; Onyeonoru, 2006).

Essentially, conflict as a phenomenon is inevitable in every human grouping. This is largely due to pursuit of diverse and incompatible interests and goals by different individuals that constitute the organization (Edwards, 2000; Otite, 2001; Onyeonoru, 2004). However, some past studies (Hammed and Ayantunji, 2002; Omoluabi, 2001; Akanji, 2005; Mitchell, 2002; Bankole and Kester, 2008) had shown that the outcome of conflict is determined largely by the conflict management behaviour exhibited by the parties involved in conflict.

In essence, the consequence of a conflict can either be functional (positive) or dysfunctional (negative) depending on how the conflict is managed by the conflicting parties. This implies that the conflict management behaviour of the parties in conflict is critical to the outcome of the conflict.

In one of their studies, Hammed 8c Ayantunji (2002) affirmed that industrial conflict as is found in most organizations today bothers on conflict management behaviour of both labour leaders(appointed or elected) and the management of the organization.

Conflict management behaviour as a concept refers to behavioral orientation that an individual holds towards conflict management. Mitchell (2002) quoting Thomas (1976) identified five conflict management behaviours (styles) based on two conceptually independent dimensions of interpersonal behaviours namely: assertiveness and co-operativeness. The five identified conflict management behaviours are competing, accommodating, avoiding, collaborating and compromising.

Competing: It depicts a situation in which one has high concern for self and low concern for others. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Psychological Predictors of Conflict Management Behaviour of Labour Leaders in Lagos State, Nigeria
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.