National Performance Management Advisory Commission Releases Framework for State and Local Governments

Government Finance Review, June 2010 | Go to article overview

National Performance Management Advisory Commission Releases Framework for State and Local Governments


The following excerpt is from the National Performance Management Advisory Commission's final report, A Performance Management Framework for State and Local Government: From Measurement and Reporting to Management and Improving. It is a message from the elected and appointed government leaders who served as members on the commission.

At no time in modern history have state, local, and provincial governments been under greater pressure to provide results that matter to the public, often within severe resource constraints. At the same time, government officials and managers are challenged to overcome the public's lack of trust in government at all levels.

We have developed this Performance Management Framework for State and Local Government to help public-sector organizations address these challenges.

The primary motive driving the commission and public-sector performance management in general is the conviction that governments must improve their focus on producing results that benefit the public, and also give the public confidence that government has produced those results. The emphasis on process and compliance that has typified traditional public-sector management has not been sufficient to make this happen. Therefore, governments must change their approach. Publicsector management must become synonymous with performance management.

Now is the time for governmental leaders to ensure that the organizations they lead are taking responsibility for achieving results that matter to the public - by practicing performance management.

Accomplishing this will require more than a conceptual framework. It will require public-sector leaders at all levels, both elected and appointed, not only to set high expectations for performance but also to make a commitment to improving performance. Leaders must instill a sense of urgency about improving performance in their governments, build performance-based organizational cultures and management structures, continuously communicate the necessity of listening to the public, and provide resources to assure that a performance-based culture and related practices are initiated and sustained. We believe that seeking out, understanding, and applying performance management principles and practices is not only a critical responsibility of public officials and managers, but that it is an ethical obligation.

To practice performance management, officials and managers must have accurate, timely, and relevant information for decision making, along with the skills and knowledge to analyze results and design improvements when needed. These are the learning and improving aspects of performance management.

Democratic governments are also obligated to be accountable to their owners - the citizenry. Performance management principles and practices give governments the ability to provide easily understood and timely information to the public so citizens can assess the results their government is producing and fulfill their role as collective owners of their governments.

The feedback we have received during the process of creating this framework has reinforced our view that governments want better information and practices that will help them improve results. This means providing better ways to:

* understand public needs;

* identify and implement programs and services that will meet those needs;

* assure that policies, strategies, and services are in alignment;

* collect and analyze performance information;

* apply information to continuously improve results and become more efficient;

* use data more effectively to inform policy decisions;

* support accountability, both within the organization and to the public;

* provide understandable information on performance to the public; and

* encourage citizens to provide feedback and get involved in the government's decision-making processes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

National Performance Management Advisory Commission Releases Framework for State and Local Governments
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.