A Fullbright Experience in Hungary: Lessons from America's Past

By Gaskins, Laverne Lewis | Diverse Issues in Higher Education, July 22, 2010 | Go to article overview

A Fullbright Experience in Hungary: Lessons from America's Past


Gaskins, Laverne Lewis, Diverse Issues in Higher Education


Hungary's Roma population and Black Americans share similar societal struggles.

In addition to my full-time duties as in-house counsel at a major university in Georgia, I occasionally teach. In March, I received a Fulbright grant to teach undergraduate and graduate students for two weeks in Hungary. My visits to various historic sites in the cities of Budapest and Eger were informative and interesting. The welcoming nature of my hosts further enhanced what was an overall positive experience.

In fulfilling my Fulbright obligations, I presented a series of lectures on the intersection of race, gender and the law from an American perspective. I discussed the Missouri Compromise, the Dred Scott decision, the Civil War, the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments, Jim Crow laws and the civil rights movement.

Generally, the students recognized similarities between the paths of progress in America and their own country. Hungarian women, for instance, have made considerable economic and social strides since gender no longer limits employment opportunities. However, following my lecture on race and the law, a few students struggled to draw parallels between America's civil rights history and the challenges of Hungary's Roma population, whose history and condition reflect a struggle with social, economic and political marginalization.

According to the Council of Europe, the Roma people first arrived in Europe around the 14th century and, with a population of approximately 10 million, is Hungary's largest minority. The Roma people maintain a distinct language, are referred to by the pejorative term "Gypsies" and are believed to have originated from India. Comments about the Roma people offered by students were, "They commit crimes, don't work and have babies to live off the state," and "I do not attend school with Roma people nor do I want my children to be educated with them." We discussed the pitfalls of stereotyping and I encouraged them to analogize the condition of the Roma people to the struggles of Black Americans in the context of de facto segregation and de jure segregation. While some students understood the invidious nature of racial prejudice, a few were unable to liken the historical plight of racial minorities in America to the Roma people.

The Council of Europe has observed that "most Roma live in extreme poverty and many of their communities are basically invisible." Roma people have suffered political, economic and social marginalization and continue to face many challenges to full integration into mainstream society. …

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