I Don't like to Be beside the Sea

By Willetts, Paul | The Spectator, September 21, 2002 | Go to article overview

I Don't like to Be beside the Sea


Willetts, Paul, The Spectator


OF LOVE AND HUNGER by Julian Maclaren-Ross Penguin, L8.99, pp. 224, ISBN 0141187115

The once celebrated writer and Soho dandy Julian Maclaren-Ross (1912-64) is nowadays best-known as the model for the flamboyant character of X. Trapnel in Anthony Powell's A Dance to the Music of Time. As a result of Maclaren-Ross's success at projecting his self-image, which blended 1890s hauteur with Hollywood cool, his idiosyncratic personality has obscured his achievements as a short story-- writer, novelist and autobiographer. With the exception of Memoirs of the Forties, his definitive portrait of wartime Fitzrovia, none of his books has been in print since his premature death. Prompted not only by the imminent release of my authorised biography of him, but also by the current groundswell of interest in his bizarre life and influential work, Penguin have rectified this omission by reissuing his 1947 novel, Of Love and Hunger, complete with a perceptive preface by D. J. Taylor.

Maclaren-Ross first achieved prominence as a writer of innovative, humorous short stories about the seedy world of army billets and drinking clubs that he knew so well. His stories tend to be narrated in a chatty style, punctuated by slang, censorship-challenging obscenities, and crisp dialogue. For all his conspicuous debt to the work of American writers such as James M. Cain and Damon Runyon, he had a refreshingly original, emphatically English tone of voice.

Like his earlier stories, Of Love and Hunger was inspired by his own experiences. While living in Bognor Regis during the 1930s, he briefly supported himself by working as a door-to-door vacuum-cleaner salesman. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

I Don't like to Be beside the Sea
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.