Spectaculum Europaeum: Theatre and Spectacle in Europe from the End of the 16th to the Middle of the 18th Century - Manuel De l'Histoire Du Spectacle En Europe De la Fin Du XVIe Au Milieu Du XVIIIe Siècle

By Scott, Paul | The Seventeenth Century, October 2002 | Go to article overview

Spectaculum Europaeum: Theatre and Spectacle in Europe from the End of the 16th to the Middle of the 18th Century - Manuel De l'Histoire Du Spectacle En Europe De la Fin Du XVIe Au Milieu Du XVIIIe Siècle


Scott, Paul, The Seventeenth Century


Pierre Béhar and Helen Watanabe-O'Kelly (eds), Spectaculum Europaeum: Theatre and Spectacle in Europe from the End of the 16th to the Middle of the 18th Century - Manuel de l'Histoire du Spectacle en Europe de la fin du XVIe au milieu du XVIIIe siècle, Wiesbaden, Harrassowitz, 1999, pp. x + 818, hb. DM 298, ISBN: 3447040394

The idea for this substantial, not to mention handsome, volume of 39 essays was conceived during a conference held in 1989 at Tours, where participants working in the field of early modern theatrical studies noted the need to 'transcend boundaries between the various disciplines and national traditions' (vii). The editors are to be congratulated for translating this complaint into a remedy, in an offering by 19 contributors divided into drama, opera, tournaments, and entries and festivals. Each of these sections contains articles dealing with aspects of each theme across nations (with the exception of an extended essay by Helen Watanabe-O'Kelly entitled 'Tournaments in Europe'). Contributions are in either French or English, a reflection of the interdisciplinary nature of the collection, with French being reserved for the Romance-speaking world.

The work is intended as a handbook (ix). As such, it is evidently not as comprehensive as an encyclopaedia, nor as concise as a text book. If the intended readership is a student one, then it will be well served by a wide-ranging coverage of early modern theatrical forms in Europe. Researchers, too, will occasionally find there is more to this volume than a reference work. Pierre Béhar's study of drama in Crete, for example, is informative and stimulating, demonstrating that an overview of the evolution of local trends during the period can yield valuable insights. Béhar argues that the development of classical ideals during the Renaissance and seventeenth century allowed Crete to hold on to its Hellenist heritage without falling out of step with cultural trends in the rest of Europe (338). Each article is followed by a bibliography, a sensible alternative to one extended bibliography for the entire volume. It is here that the variable quality of some of the contributions comes into play. The bibliography provided for the Ruprecht Wimmer's contribution on neo-Latin European theatre is impressively thorough, an ideal resource to encourage further research (51-77). Readers consulting the recommended works following Pierre Béhar's essay on 'la tragédie et la comédie en France et leurs variantes', however, will be frustrated by the erratic arrangement of works into themes and authors (though only one mention each for tragi-comedy and opera), and in chronological rather than alphabetical order (188-196). This is compounded by notable absences, such as Perry Gethner (Rotrou), Mitchell Greenberg (Corneille), as well as some typographical errors (Patrick Dandrey instead of Dandray, 194). The differences in bibliographical layout will hinder, though ultimately not impede, the work's utility as a research tool.

Generalisations, inevitable in a work of this scope, are occasionally misleading. Surely the impact of the Reformation deserves more than a mere paragraph (5-6)? While many hagiographic legends dramatised in the early modern period date from the beginning of the Church's history, Hermenigildus, martyred by Arians in 576, is rather late to be classed as an early Church martyr (17), and Baronius revised and edited the Martyrologium Romanum, he did not create it (44). The 1548 interdiction of the mystery-play by the Parlement of Paris only named the capital and environs, so did not banish such performances from the provinces, as suggested by Béhar (164). Louis XIII's edict of 1641 absolving actors of the charge of infamy, authored largely by Richelieu, is surprisingly not mentioned in an account of the development of the theatre in France (164). Despite the bibliographies contained in the volume suffering from a lack of a consistent format, and stylistic infelicities, the work's strength lies in its parts. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Spectaculum Europaeum: Theatre and Spectacle in Europe from the End of the 16th to the Middle of the 18th Century - Manuel De l'Histoire Du Spectacle En Europe De la Fin Du XVIe Au Milieu Du XVIIIe Siècle
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.