Lighting Upgrades 101

By Bloom, Susan | Journal of Property Management, September/October 2010 | Go to article overview

Lighting Upgrades 101


Bloom, Susan, Journal of Property Management


Boost Your Property's Energy Efficiency and Cost Savings with Audits and Incentives

IN TODAY'S CHALLENGING ECONOMY, PROPERTY MANAGERS AND REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS ARE ALWAYS LOOKING FOR WAYS TO REDUCE OPERATING COSTS while enhancing the appeal of their properties. Lighting upgrades are a simple way to cut costs, reduce energy, enhance property valuation and support the environment.

Lighting accounts for roughly 22 percent of all the electricity consumed in the United States, according to the Department of Energy. Upgrades involving more energy-efficient lamps, ballasts, lighting controls and other components readily available in the marketplace could potentially reduce that figure by one-third or more.

Depending on the technologies involved, lighting upgrades can routinely deliver 30 to 50 percent returns on investment and two- to three-year (or even faster) paybacks.

CONDUCT AN AUDIT OF YOUR LIGHTING

A lighting audit will help you determine the functionality of your current lighting systems, as well as any potential upgrades.

This audit should evaluate the light source being used in each area, its wattage, quantity and when it was last upgraded. If you don't possess the in-house expertise to conduct a lighting audit on your own, a local electrical distributor, electrical contractor, energy service company, lighting maintenance company or utility professional can give you a low or no-cost (and no-obligation) run-down of the technologies currently installed, as well as an estimate of your property's savings opportunity.

In addition to a formal audit, real estate managers should review their utility bills each month, said Steven Myers, manager of training and education at Philips Lighting Company.

Property managers can calculate the value of one watt of energy saved or spent annually by collecting the following information:

* Kilowatt per hour (kWh) cost- for example, the cost of 1,000 watts burning for one hour

* Number of kilowatts used

* Number of hours the lights are on per day and per week, which can then be annualized to determine the hours per year

Armed with this information, it's easy to determine how much money can be saved by upgrading lamps to more energy efficient models. For example, if you pay $.40 per watt per year and you upgrade to a more efficient lighting alternative that consumes 10 fewer watts than your previous lamp, you would save $4 on energy costs per year per lamp. If this particular lamp was housed in a four-lamp fixture, that would amount to savings of $16 per year, per fixture.

Paul Hafner, energy consultant with New Yorkbased firm, Maintained Illumination, said people often ignore their energy costs, even though doing so can result in wasted energy and money.

"We advise people to regard their electricity usage as much as they would a leaky faucet," he said. "If you had a leak in your plumbing, you would act quickly because you can hear it and see it. The excessive use of electricity is just another type of 'leak,' but one that is often overlooked because it's more hidden from our senses."

KNOW YOUR LIGHTING UPGRADE OPTIONS

Today's broad range of innovative and proven lighting technologies are routinely delivering the benefits of high performance, low maintenance and significant energy savings within residential property settings. For example:

* Sconces in common areas that once housed incandescent bulbs can be easily upgraded with compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), which use up to 75 percent less energy than incandescent lamps and last seven to 10 times longer. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Lighting Upgrades 101
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.