Fall 2010 Preview: School Psychology Forum

By Shaw, Steven R. | National Association of School Psychologists. Communique, November 2010 | Go to article overview

Fall 2010 Preview: School Psychology Forum


Shaw, Steven R., National Association of School Psychologists. Communique


School Psychology Forum is now a quarterly journal that will be available online. Beginning with the spring 2011 issue, we will standardize SPF to have three articles, commentaries, and multimedia content. Feel free to send commentaries or new articles for consideration to SchoolPsychForum@naspweb.org.

The fall 2010 issue is devoted to diverse medical issues and school psychology. This issue presents two data-based and two literature review papers. Yet, all papers have specific applications to the practice of school psychology. Full content of these papers can be found at http://www.nasponline.org/publications/spf/spfissues.aspx.

Late Effects of Childhood Cancer: Implications for School Psychologists

Kathy L. Bradley-Klug & Ashley N. Sundman

The purpose of this article is to present the most common late effects of childhood cancer that negatively impact a survivor's academic, physical, and psychosocial outcomes. Evidence-based prevention and intervention strategies to limit the impact of these late effects are discussed. The importance of developing partnerships across educational, medical, and family systems is stressed along with suggestions for school psychologists to facilitate systems-level communication and collaboration to ultimately provide optimal educational experiences for survivors of childhood cancer.

Transitioning to Postsecondary Education WKh Positive Mental Health: A Preliminary Correlational Study

Laura M. Anderson & Albee Therese S. Ongsuco

This study examined intercorrelations among health-promoting beliefs and behaviors, perceived stress, and college adjustment among postsecondary students. Results indicated, formales and females: (a) astrongnegative correlation between perceived stress and college adjustment, (b) a significant positive association among health-promoting beliefs and behaviors and college adjustment, and (c) a significant negative association among health-promoting beliefs andbehaviors and perceived stress. …

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