Campaign Contributors and the Nevada Supreme Court

By Reddick, Malia; Janning, Nicholas | Judicature, September/October 2010 | Go to article overview

Campaign Contributors and the Nevada Supreme Court


Reddick, Malia, Janning, Nicholas, Judicature


This November, Nevada voters will decide whether to continue choosing their judges in nonpartisan elections or to move to a merit selection system with retention elections and judicial performance evaluation. The proposed constitutional amendment will appear as Question 1 on the ballot. Originally known as Senate Joint Resolution (SJR) 2, the measure was sponsored by Senate Minority Leader Bill Raggio, a Republican from Reno, and Assembly Speaker Barbara Bucldey, a Democrat from Las Vegas. SJR 2 was approved by legislative majorities in 2007 and 2009, as required for constitutional amendments proposed by the legislature. Nevada has used a merit selection process to fill judicial vacancies that arise between elections since 1976, but voters rejected proposals that would have instituted merit selection for all judgeships on three past occasions - in 1972, 1988, and 1996.

The new politics of judicial elections article in this issue (see page 50} documents the transformation of judicial elections over the last decade, particularly when it comes to fundraising. Nearly $207 million was raised across the country by state supreme court candidates from 2000 to 2009 - more than double the $83.3 million raised from 1990 to 1999. Nevada ranked eighth among states with contested high court races, with candidates for the supreme court raising a recordbreaking $9.8 million. Approximately $3.1 million was raised in the 2008 election cycle alone.

Recent national polling suggests a growing concern among the public that justice may be for sale in state courts. According to a poll conducted earlier this year, seven in ten Americans believe that judicial campaign money has a significant impact on courtroom decisions. Supporters of Question 1, who believe that reform is necessary to preserve public confidence in the state's courts, hope that recent judicial election trends both nationally and in Nevada will help to generate support for the measure.

The American Judicature Society is working with a coalition known as Nevadans for Qualified Judges to educate voters about the benefits of merit selection, retention elections, and performance evaluation over contested elections. One aspect of this work is an examination of whether Nevada citizens have reason to worry that campaign contributions may influence judicial decisions. AJS analyzed the frequency with which contribu tore to the campaigns of Nevada Supreme Court justices later appeared before the court. The study examined civil cases decided by the court in 2008 and 2009, and determined the number of cases in which at least one of the litigants, attorneys, or law firms involved made a contribution to at least one justice.1

The Nevada Supreme Court decided 112 civil cases with published opinions in 2008 and 2009.y Eighty-one of these were decided by the court en bane and 31 were decided by a three-judge panel. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Campaign Contributors and the Nevada Supreme Court
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.