In the Presence of Grief: Helping Family Members Resolve Death, Dying, and Bereavement Issues

By Hargrave, Terry D. | Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, October 2002 | Go to article overview

In the Presence of Grief: Helping Family Members Resolve Death, Dying, and Bereavement Issues


Hargrave, Terry D., Journal of Marital and Family Therapy


Becvar, D. S. (2001). In the presence of grief: Helping family members resolve death, dying, and bereavement issues. New York: Guilford.

There are many books that give us theoretical and clinical information that may prove useful and, in some cases, invaluable to our practices. There are also many books that touch us emotionally because the author bridges the gap between the pages and our minds with wisdom and inspiration. There are few books, however, that manage to do both effectively. Dorothy Becvar has thankfully managed this feat as she gives a gift in the form of this book on working with issues surrounding death.

The primary premise of the book is that it is not possible, nor even desirable to "get over" the loss of close relationships. Instead, Becvar points us toward an idea of embracing grief as a companion that accompanies us through a complex of journey of healing. Most literature in the grief field is aimed at moving people to a point of adaptation. Becvar does this also, but with the unique twist of learning the lessons of grief so life can eventually become joyful and full of wisdom.

In part one, "The contexts of grief," the book begins with an overview of death, dying, and bereavement issues. Although this review may be ground already covered for the experienced clinician, the summary of both clinical and research findings are both complete and precise. This overview would be invaluable to those who are new to the clinical work on grief. Becvar then proceeds to present the different scenarios in which death occurs, such as unexpected death, death of a child, death of a spouse, and death of a parent. These chapters make up the bulk of the book. In part two, "Grief in the context of therapy," we are given three chapters on specific issues that clients are likely to encounter in moving through the grief experience in therapy. These chapters focus on funerals and other rituals, finding meaning in the grief process, and reclaiming joy along with the sorrow of grief. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

In the Presence of Grief: Helping Family Members Resolve Death, Dying, and Bereavement Issues
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.