Overcomes Obstacles with Music Therapy

International Musician, December 2010 | Go to article overview

Overcomes Obstacles with Music Therapy


THE PENDERICKI STRING QUARTET

They've toured extensively throughout Canada and the world, recorded more than 25 albums, and championed the string program at Wilfrid Laurier University (WLU). The Pendericki String Quartet has become one of the top performing chamber ensembles. One of the keys to the string quartet's success: music therapy.

"The more you know someone, the more you can trust them," says violinist Jeremy Bell of Local 149 (Toronto, ON). "Music therapy is another way of opening doors to each other, to let each other in, and to make musical connections more alive and real for each other."

Music therapy has fostered personal bonds between Bell and Local 226 (Kitchener, ON) members cellist Jacob Braun, violinist Jerzy Kaplanek, and violist Christine Vlajk and led them to challenge themselves musically.

The quartet, now in its second decade, began with a group of Polish graduate students at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, and it then moved to Canada for residency at WLU in Toronto. "We're very Canadian in terms of our diversity of spirit," Bell says. "We're very malleable."

The quartet has experimented in many different music genres, with a variety of musicians, including Brazilian jazz musician Egberto Gismonti, pipa virtuoso Ching Wong, and Local 293 (Hamilton, ON) violinist Martin Beaver. In some of its most diverse performances, the group performed with New York City DJ Spooky, and even a quantum computer.

"It's very humbling for a string quartet to go about trying to be eclectic," Bell explains. "We're inspired by challenge for the sake of a challenge. You hear a genre that is sort of foreign to you and you want to know more about it. Sometimes we're jumping in blindly-sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't."

Music therapy has helped the quartet learn to trust each other to take blind leaps of faith. The idea to try music therapy came from Dr. Colin Andrew Lee, a music therapist for 26 years and the music therapy director at WLU. Although music therapy is most often used for individuals with special needs, Lee was interested to see how it could be applied to professional musicians. He saw its potential after the quartet's members began changing, and approached them to partake in music therapy sessions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Overcomes Obstacles with Music Therapy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.