Christianity in Action: The International History of the Salvation Army

By Piehl, Mel | The Catholic Historical Review, January 2011 | Go to article overview

Christianity in Action: The International History of the Salvation Army


Piehl, Mel, The Catholic Historical Review


Christianity in Action: The International History of the Salvation Army. By Henry Gariepy. (Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans. 2009. Pp. xvi, 286. $25.00. ISBN 978-0-802-84841-3.)

Few organizations in the world enjoy more widespread recognition than the Salvation Army. Almost all Americans are familiar with its ubiquitous street-corner bell-ringing, especially at Christmas time, and with its long history of social service, including its "soup kitchens" and other ministries to those in need. A prominent advertising agency recently rated the Army's redshield logo as one of the ten most instantly recognizable "brand names" in the world.

What is not quite so widely understood, however, is that the Salvation Army is not simply a religiously motivated social service organization, but has always been, since its American founding in 1880, a freestanding Protestant Christian denomination. Religiously, it belongs firmly to the family of "holiness" churches that emerged from Methodism in the late-nineteenth century, and as such it retains much in common within other similar denominations, often with "Holiness" or "Wesleyan" as part of their name.

However, more than most such denominations of similar or equal size, the Army's flamboyant beginnings, its genius for spectacular public relations, and its highly visible place in American life make its history of considerable intrinsic interest to religious historians and a potentially rich subject for scholarly interpretation. Moreover, the Army's strong social and religious conservatism, and its longtime affinity with powerful private and governmental institutions, are especially deserving of full, fair, and careful analysis.

Colonel Henry Gariepy's Christianity in Action is not such a study. Rather, it is a celebratory, pious institutional history by the longtime chief editor of the Army's official publication The War Cry and a faculty member of its "Officer Training College" (what more conventional denominations label a seminary). The book's foreword by the commanding general of the church's international headquarters in London and its jacket endorsements by other prominent Salvationist officers (i. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Christianity in Action: The International History of the Salvation Army
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.