Educator Teams Up to Teach Finance to Young Children

By O'Neil-Haight, Megan | Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, Spring 2010 | Go to article overview

Educator Teams Up to Teach Finance to Young Children


O'Neil-Haight, Megan, Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences


Based on current research and conventional wisdom, financial education should begin at an early age. With the exception of a few generally underutilized in- school banking programs, Maryland's Lower Eastern Shore, like so many other areas across the nation, has few or no school-based financial literacy programs. Although educators understand the importance of teaching students basic money skills, tight schedules, lack of resources and low confidence in utilizing resources effectively stand as barriers to meeting this newly recognized priority.

A partnership with 23 public, private, and parochial schools and Head Start centers was developed to inspire and educate more than 5,000 children, ages 3 to 11, their parents, and their classroom teachers on making saving money a habit. The Parents and Teachers as Wealth Coaches project embodied a unique educational, entrepreneurial, and philanthropic triad of resources coming together to provide a high quality, best solution financial education program via the regular school setting, without discrimination, to all students. The goals were to reach young children with basic messages of personal financial responsibility, to deliver age-appropriate educational resources and, in the process, to model ways of teaching personal finance to teachers and parents - and to connect with as many individuals as possible.

The Parents and Teachers as Wealth Coaches project was born out of one educator's vision and it was driven by her determination. It began as an idea with no money and there was no assurance that school systems would be receptive, just a hope. There was no proof that it would be effective, just a belief . There was no corps of volunteers, just one Extension educator and a determination to bring public, private, and municipal resources together to formulate a high quality youth financial literacy education program that could be delivered in volume. Primary targeted areas for program delivery were Somerset, Wicomico, and Worcester Counties in southeastern Maryland. Somerset County has the distinction of being ranked highest among all 23 counties and the City of Baltimore in Maryland with regard to child poverty. According to a Children in Poverty (2007) survey, the Maryland statewide child poverty rate is 10%. The state data show the percentage of Somerset County children ages 0-17 who live in families with incomes below the federal poverty level is 27.9% and Wicomico and Worcester Counties trail closely, falling within the top six, with child poverty rates of 17.2% and 16.5%, respectively.

To identify the appropriate project partner, the Extension educator scanned available curricula for the target age group via Google. This research led to the discovery of the It's A Habit! Company, Inc., a Los Angeles based socially conscious small business specializing in financial literacy education geared to young children and their mentors. The It's A Habit! website (http://www.itsahabit.com/) indicates it is "dedicated to changing children's lives one dime at a time." The founder, Sam X Renick, created mascot character programs to compliment his self-authored books. They have been piloted in several schools in California. The programs seemed a perfect fit for the project: affordable, scalable to different ages and stages, developmentally appropriate and multi- sensory. After 7 years in business, the company's method has gained positive and reputable acclaim from educators, professional associations, and the media. The multiple communication modes (music, movement, reading aloud, call and response, and paper and pencil activities) seemed to teach and excite all children. At the same time, the materials and live performances have the potential to inspire teachers and parents in imaginative and fun ways to reinforce messages about saving, spending, and financial responsibility both in school and at home.

To address the need, 23 school-based student assemblies and one Head Start Family Read night were organized and conducted between October 2006 and November 2008. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Educator Teams Up to Teach Finance to Young Children
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.