Scottish Life and Society: Oral Literature and Performance Culture

By Shoupe, Catherine A. | Western Folklore, Summer/Fall 2010 | Go to article overview

Scottish Life and Society: Oral Literature and Performance Culture


Shoupe, Catherine A., Western Folklore


Scottish Life and Society: Oral Literature and Performance Culture. A Compendium of Scottish Ethnology, vol. 10. Edited by John Beech, Owen Hand, Mark A. MulheiTi, and Jeremy Weston. (Edinburgh: Birlinn Ltd., in association with the European Ethnological Research Centre, 2007. Pp. xxii + 616, foreword, acknowledgments, introduction, photographs, illustrations, tables, musical notation, chapter notes, chapter bibliographies, list of abbreviations, glossary, index. $90.00 cloth.)

Series editor Alexander Fen ton describes this tenth in the fourteen-volume Compendium of Scottish Ethnology as "a presentation of the research that has been carried out thus far on oral, music, and performance traditions, which can serve as a basis for future work" (xvi). The thirty-two articles attest to the breadth of the multiple, often interweaving strands of traditional performance in Scotland, as well as its linguistic, regional, and social diversity. For the most part, the survey-of-scholarship goal is well met. Recognition of immigrants as contributors to die mix is lacking, however, and directions for "future work" are less clearly developed. A further goal, to "place the object of those studies in a wide Scottish, British, and European context" (3), is only partially achieved, although the Centre's perspective of grounding tradition in history as a necessity for analyzing the present is clearly evident. Most authors approach their reviews of ethnographic research chronologically and discuss the impact of nineteenthcentury economic and societal changes on oral culture. The deep and wide levels of literacy in Scotland are also noted, the interplay of orality and literacy understood as forming the warp and weft of traditions.

Part One, Narrative and Verse, begins with a masterful chapter by Fiona MacDonald - an extended bibliographic essay on Lowland and Gaelic narrative collection in the nineteenth century, past trends in folktale research and theory, and twentieth-century collection. John Shaw's chapter on the context and function of storytellers in Scotland draws on the ethnological perspective suggested by Ruth Finnegan (1977) and Hammersley and Atkinson (2007 [1983]). Three short surveys describe narrative in the Northern Isles, among Travellers, and overseas, separating these smaller or more distinctive traditions from the mainstream. Gaelic traditions are the subject of three fine chapters: John Macinnes examines hero tale and panegyric; Donald Meek surveys verse of the township, clearances, emigration, and the evangelical revival; and a short survey of modern legends identifies contemporary narratives that resonate with similar forms in Europe and the United States. The historical perspective returns with Domhnall Uilleam Stiubhart's "The Uses of Historical Traditions in Modern Gaelic." Another short chapter surveys storytelling and international folklore, covering some of the same ground as previous chapters but adding a new focus on women's role in tale traditions. One might wish that author Barbara Hillers had devoted her entire chapter to this topic. The section ends with a fine bibliographic essay by Fionnuala ('arson Williams on the scholarship and theoretical approaches of proverb study. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Scottish Life and Society: Oral Literature and Performance Culture
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.