Bibliography of the Visual Arts and Architecture in the South, Part XXII

By Bonner, Judith H. | Southern Quarterly, Fall 2010 | Go to article overview

Bibliography of the Visual Arts and Architecture in the South, Part XXII


Bonner, Judith H., Southern Quarterly


GENERAL

Allured, Janet, Judith F. Gentry. Louisiana Women: Their Lives and Times. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2009.

Includes essays: "Clementine Hunter: Self-taught Louisiana Artist," by Lee Kogan; and "Caroline Dormon: Louisiana's Cultural Conservator," by Dayna Bowker Lee.

Amaki, Amalia K. A Century of African American Art: The Paul R. Jones Collection. Newark, DE: University Museum, University of Delaware; New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2004.

Includes essays: "Flash from the past: hidden messages in the photographs of Prentice Herman Polk," by Amalia K. Amaki; "African American Printmakers: Toward a More Democratic Art," by Winston Kennedy; and "Preservation for Posterity: the Paul R. Jones Photography Collection," by Debra Hess Norris, among others. Artists include: Romare Bearden; Elizabeth Catlett; Jacob Lawrence; Henry Ossawa Tanner; James Van Der Zee; Carrie Mae Weems; Hale Woodruff.

Barratt, Carrie Rebora, and H. Barbara Weinberg. "The Pursuit of Authenticity: American Artists As They Saw Themselves." Magazine Antiques 176.5 (November 2009): pp.70-79.

Bernier, Celeste-Marie. African American Visual Arts: From Slavery to the Present. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2008.

Beyond the Blues: Reflections of African Americans in the Fine Arts Collection of the Amistad Research Center. New Orleans, LA: Amistad Research Center and New Orleans Museum of Art, 2010.

Black, Parti Carr. American Masters of the Mississippi Gulf Coast: George Ohr, Dusti Bongé, Walter Anderson, Richmond B arthé. Jackson, MS: Mississippi Arts Commission and Department of Art, Mississippi State University, 2009.

Introduction by Malcolm White.

Bonner, Judith H. "A Place of Their Own: Women Artists in Louisiana, 1825-1965." Louisiana Cultural Vistas 20.2 (Summer 2009):pp.24-33.

_____. "Women Artists in Louisiana, 1825-1965 : A Place of Their Own." Arts Quarterly 31.2 (April-June 2009):pp. 10-12.

_____. "Women Artists in Louisiana, 1825-1965 : A Place of Their Own." The Historic New Orleans Quarterly 26.2 (Spring 2009):p.8.

_____. "Women Artists in Louisiana, 1965-2010." Arts Quarterly 32.2 (April-June 2010):pp.10-11.

Artists exhibited at the New Orleans Museum of Art include:, Lynda Benglis, Jacqueline Bishop Jane Nulty Bowman, Lin Emery, Mignon Faget, Suzanne Fosberg, Joanne Greenberg, Angela Gregory, Shearly Grode, Ronna Harris, Gail Hood, Ann Hornback, Jacqueline Humphries, Ida Kohlmeyer, Carol Leake, Shirley Rabé Masinter, Chyrl Savoy, Eugenie "Ersy" Schwartz, Patricia Whitty, Margaret Witherspoon, Mildred Wohl, and Jesselyn Zurik. Photographers include: Debbie Fleming Caffery, Sandra Russell Clark, Dawn Dedeaux, Josephine Sacabo, and Tina Freeman.

_____. "Women Artists in Louisiana, 1965-2010." The Historic New Orleans Quarterly 27.2 (Spring 20 10):p.8.

Bostic, Connie. The Shape of Imagination: Women of Black Mountain College. Asheville, NC: Black Mountain College Museum and Arts Center, 2008.

Collins, Lisa Gail, Lisa Mintz Messinger, Rachel Mustalish. African-American Artists, 1929-1945: Prints, Drawings, and Paintings in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2003.

Davis, Anita Price. New Deal Art in North Carolina: The Murals, Sculptures, Reliefs, Paintings, Oils, and Frescoes and Their Creators. Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company, 2009.

French, Hill J., and Janet Keller, editors. The Cathedral of St. Andrew Stained Glass Windows: Little Rock, Arkansas: Our Cathedral, Our Heritage, Our Mother Church of the Diocese of Little Rock. Little Rock, AR: Cathedral of St. Andrew, 2006.

Hills, Patricia, Melissa Renn, Boston University Art Gallery. Syncopated Rhythms: 20th-century African American Art from the George and Joyce Wein Collection. Boston, MA: Boston University Art Gallery, 2005.

Catalogue distributed by University of Washington Press for an exhibition from 18 November 2005-22 January 2006. …

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