Todd Sisley Named Editor of THE AMERICAN ORGANIST

By Thomashower, James E. | The American Organist, January 2011 | Go to article overview

Todd Sisley Named Editor of THE AMERICAN ORGANIST


Thomashower, James E., The American Organist


Todd Sisley has been appointed the sixth editor of The American Organist succeeding editor emeritus Anthony Baglivi. His appointment was ratified by the AGO National Council during the first week of December. The Council approved the appointment of Mr. Sisley based on the recommendation of the Executive Director and the AGO Personnel Committee following an extensive search undertaken by a search committee comprised of President Eileen Guenther, Haig Mardirosian, and James Thomashower.

An experienced church musician, an officer of the Eastern New York AGO Chapter, and a 15-year veteran with the TAO staff, Todd Sisley has extensive hands-on knowledge of the organ and choral worlds and the constituency to which the magazine is dedicated. A church organist since the 1970s, he pursued undergraduate studies at the New England Conservatory in Boston, Mass., and earned a bachelor of fine arts degree from the State University of New York at Purchase. Todd subsequently attended the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, from which he graduated with a master of music degree in 1987. In 1991 and 1992, he was named a Fellow in Vocal Accompanying at the Tanglewood Music Center in Lenox, Mass.

Todd joined the AGO Headquarters staff in 1993, working as an office assistant in the membership department. He was soon promoted to Assistant to Executive Director Daniel Colburn, and in 1996 he began working on the magazine with Copy Editor Robert Price under the direction of Anthony Baglivi. Todd was named Editorial Assistant of TAO in 1998, and since that time has been involved in all areas of the magazine's publication from proofreading through advertising and production. In 2007, he was promoted to Associate Editor of the magazine. Following Mr. Baglivi's retirement at the end of 2009, Todd served as TAO's Acting Editor and Advertising Manager, overseeing the timely and professional production of all twelve issues of the magazine published in 2010 while maintaining the publication's highest standards and reputation for excellence.

In meetings with the AGO Search Committee to discuss the future of the magazine, Todd was energized and creative. Acknowledging that TAO could benefit from a "face-lift," he recommended a series of gradual changes in the magazine's appearance. He provided a glimpse into the future by presenting mock-ups of pages redesigned in full color with new fonts, headers, and subheads, and more leading (space) between the lines.

Todd suggested that effective with the January issue, each issue in its entirety should be posted on the AGO's Web site with access limited to members and protected by password. He recommended that Pipings and Calendar should be put online in real time, so that members would have timely access to these postings, and urged that an archive of Chapter News reports be made available online as well.

Looking ahead, Todd indicated that for 2011 he has planned magazine covers featuring eight organbuilders who have never graced the cover before. He also expressed his desire to work with the AGO's Editorial Resources Board and to maintain openness and flexibility with regard to the content of TAO, broadening the kinds of articles and columns that TAO solicits and prints. …

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