Pharmacists Are Taking More Direct Patient Care Roles, Survey Finds

By Gebhart, Fred | Drug Topics, November 2010 | Go to article overview

Pharmacists Are Taking More Direct Patient Care Roles, Survey Finds


Gebhart, Fred, Drug Topics


If it seems as if fewer pharmacists are spending 100% of their time on dispensing, it's true, according to the results of the latest pharmacy workforce study. Fewer pharmacists than ever before are devoting their full time to dispensing medication.

"The highlight of the manpower study was that just 41 % of pharmacists were totally devoted to distribution," lead author Jon C. Schommer, PhD, told Drug Topics. According to Schommer, a professor in the department of pharmaceutical care and health systems at the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy in Minneapolis, increasing numbers of pharmacists are investing part or all of their professional time in patient care and other nondispensing services.

"We can't relate that number directly to our last report in 2004 because our methods have changed," Schommer said. "But my gut feeling is that both the percentage and the absolute numbers of pharmacists who are not dispensing at all is rising."

Previous surveys

Pharmacy workforce surveys were last conducted in 2004 and 2000, Schommer said. The latest survey was detailed in the University of Minnesota publication "Innovations in Pharmacy," published earlier this year as "Pharmacist Contributions to the U.S. Health Care System." Funding for the project was provided by the Pharmacy Manpower Project and the American Pharmacists Association (APhA).

"This kind of detail is extremely informative and helpful as we are working to advance pharmacists' patient-care services," said Anne Burns, vice president of professional affairs, APhA. "It gives us insight into key questions like whether pharmacy has the capacity to get more involved in patient care and whether pharmacists want to move in that direction. Now we know that the answer to both of those questions is an unequivocal yes."

2009 respondents

Burns' confidence is based on the 2009 National Pharmacist Workforce Survey, which was mailed to a randorn sample of 3,000 pharmacists nationwide whose names were taken from a database of approximately 249,000 licensed pharmacists. Of the 3,000 surveys mailed, 2,667 were not returned by the U.S. Postal Service and were presumed to have been delivered to their addressees. Of the surveys delivered, 1,391 were returned, a usable response rate of 52.2%.

The analysis employed 2 continuous variables, Schommer said: the percentage of time spent in activities connected with the provision of medication and the percentage of time spent in activities connected with patient care.

Pharmacist activities

For purposes of the survey, provision of medication included dispensing and related activities such as product preparation, patient counseling, interacting with patients about the selection and use of over-the-counter products, and interacting with physicians and other professionals during the process of providing medication.

Patient care included assessing and evaluating patient needs connected with medication, monitoring and adjusting medication therapy, and other services provided as part of patient-care management.

Four other activities were included in the survey:

* Business/organizational management: Managing personnel, finances, and systems

* Research: Discovering, developing, and evaluating of products, services, or ideas

* Education: Acting as a teacher, preceptor, and mentor

* Other activities not covered in other categories

Analysis identified 5 segments, or clusters, of pharmacy practitioners:

* Medication providers (41% of pharmacists) who spent 88% of their working time providing medication and 5% of their working time providing patient care

* Medication providers who also provided patient care (25% of pharmacists) and who spent 65% of working time on providing medication and 19% on providing patient care

* Pharmacists engaged in other activities (16% of pharmacists), who spent 5% of their working time providing medication and 3% providing patient care

* Patient-care providers who also provide medication (12% of pharmacists) and who spent 43% of their working time on patient care and 33% on providing medication

* Patient-care providers (6% of pharmacists) who spent 82% of their working time on patient care and 5% on providing medication

Workforce trends

According to survey results, the overall pharmacy workforce is 53% male, the median age is 50, 26% have earned a PharmD degree, and 9% have residency experience. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Pharmacists Are Taking More Direct Patient Care Roles, Survey Finds
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.