Achieving Project Management Excellence through Best Practices

By Veatch, Steven Wade | Information Management, January/February 2011 | Go to article overview

Achieving Project Management Excellence through Best Practices


Veatch, Steven Wade, Information Management


Achieving Project Management Excellence Through Best Practices

Project Management Best Practices: Achieving Global Excellence

Author: Harold Kerzner

Publisher: Wiley Publishing Inc.

Publication Date: 2006

Length: 456 pages

Price: $85 in hardcover

ISBN 13: 978-0471793687

Source: www.wlley.com

Today, with rapid technological change, intense competition, changing customer expectations, and increased globalization, project management solutions are not only in demand but are recognized as a critical part of successful organizations. Projects must be completed faster, cheaper, and with higher-quality results - objectives that are met through effective project management processes and techniques that utilize best practices.

Project Management Best Practices: Achieving Global Excellence by Harold Kerzner is a focused presentation on "advanced project management topics necessary for implementation of and excellence in project management." Kerzner, in light of his current position as senior executive director for project, program, and portfolio management at the International Institute of Learning, is well suited to the task.

Survival of the Organization

Kerzner's book, which consists of 17 illustrated chapters, covers advanced project management topics and is intended primarily for experienced project managers and senior executives. The author's central argument is that "project management has evolved from a set of processes that were once considered 'nice' to have to a structured methodology that is considered mandatory for the survival of the firm."

Kerzner argues that organizations are beginning to realize their overall business can be viewed as a series of projects. Excellent companies are jnanaging their businesses as ects, using best practices to improve project management and bring better control of data, as well as financial, physical, and human resources. Additionally, best practices improve customer relations, shorten development times, improve productivity, and lower costs - all of which add value to the organization.

Impiementation of Best Practices

Because all projects and organizations vary, Kerzner quotes more than 50 practitioners of project management who discuss best practices in project management, how they apply these practices in their organizations, and how they align best practices and project management with their strategic plans.

The quoted practitioners have obtained excellence in project management quickly - most in less than five years. These experts continually search for innovative tools and techniques, a reminder that best practices drive improvement and excellence. These firsthand accounts from project managers and executives are the greatest value of this book.

Capturing Best Practices

As project management makes its way through each area of an organization, notes Kerzner, best practices must be captured and viewed as intellectual property to be maintained in libraries of best practices and lessons learned. …

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